Treatments for Neuropathy

Neuropathy is a painful and sometimes severe condition where nerve damage causes pain, tingling, and numbness from affected sensory nerves, and lack of coordination or control in motor nerves. It can be caused by cancer treatment medications, high blood sugar levels, and other conditions, and is most common in the feet and legs. Effective treatment calms the nerves and restores blood and oxygen flow so that the damage can heal.

Acupuncture is one of the most effective treatments for neuropathy, with an over 75% success rate after a course of 4 or 5 weekly treatments. Most people maintain their improvements unless the condition is caused by medication they are still taking. The treatments work to improve nerve conduction and reduce the stagnation of energy in the limbs, restoring balance to the flow of the body.

Bodywork and massage treat neuropathy by focusing on restoring blood circulation to the small vessels that provide oxygen to the nerves in the feet and hands. Without enough oxygen, the nerves malfunction and send signals of pain, tingling, burning, and numbness. Treatments need to be at least 60 min once/week and focus on working as deeply as is comfortable, with the goal of eventually flushing all the stagnant blood out of the tissue. It is also important to do at least 15 min a day of self-massage and range of motion exercises at home to support the detailed work of the treatments and continue to make progress.

Therapeutic movement classes, like yoga and tai chi, strengthen the communication between nerves and brain and also help treat neuropathy. Opening up the front of the body increases oxygenation and improves blood circulation, helping to nourish the affected nerves. Classes also are generally calming to the nervous system, which helps ease the pain symptoms. Regular classes, especially when taken along with other treatments, help keep the pain from getting worse and support the healing process.

Neuropathy is an often painful condition that can be treated, and acupuncture, bodywork and massage, and movement classes like yoga and tai chi all help reduce pain, increase circulation, and support healing for damaged nerves. Because nerve pain is often due to a lack of oxygen, increasing blood flow can go a long way toward easing symptoms and creating health.

How to Think More Clearly

Mental clarity and general brain function can be affected by depression, disease, dysfunction, and general aging. Symptoms can include brain fog, frequent inability to think of the right word, forgetfulness, insomnia, and chronic restlessness. There are many ways to boost clarity of thought and brain health at HaLé, including treatment through acupuncture, bodywork, and classes.

Acupuncture approaches mental clarity by improving flow to the brain, which then helps to regulate information processing and response to stimuli. By significantly improving cerebral glucose metabolism of the brain, acupuncture can improve memory, concentration, and cognitive function. Thus far, all studies that have looked at how acupuncture affects mental performance, ranging from studies on dementia to college exam performance, have produced positive results.

Bodywork and massage also help with mental clarity, especially since tight neck and shoulder muscles can limit circulation to the brain. Sessions help to activate the left side of the brain, which boosts motivation, and they alleviate the mental block of stress, which frees up energy for creative thinking and completing tasks. Bodywork has also been shown to have a cumulative effect on improving memory, increasing awareness, and heightening alertness.

Therapeutic movement classes like yoga, tai chi, and MELT Method are also helpful for improving clarity of thought because of their blend of physical activity and mindfulness practice. Movement classes are shown to increase the levels of various biochemicals in the muscles and brain that are associated with improved brain health. Because they also incorporate mindfulness, they have been shown to be more effective than aerobic exercise alone for helping the brain focus, process information, and remember details. They provide positive stimulation of the brain, which supports optimal brain function and helps you stay alert and sharp.

Mental clarity and brain function is an aspect of health that can be supported and addressed, just like any other health issue. Whether your concerns are due to aging, medication, or other causes, it is possible to create and maintain brain health for improved function and clearer thinking.

Natural Treatments for Depression and Anxiety

Mood disorders like depression and anxiety are common, and are caused by complex interactions of brain chemistry, stress hormones, genetics, and other factors. The CDC recommends a collaborative approach, including primary care providers, mental health specialists, and other providers. HaLé treatments offer substantial support and mood regulation to complement medical care.

Bodywork and massage lower stress hormones by up to 50%, and boost levels of serotonin and dopamine, which are mood stabilizers. Sessions provide safe, nurturing touch, which makes space for you to relax, refocus, and find clarity. The effects are also cumulative. The first session can significantly reduce anxiety, and a series of sessions can provide reductions that are twice as large.

Acupuncture is a treatment that works to rebalance the systems of the body, and mood disorders are usually symptoms of a deep and/or complex imbalance. It is proven to reduce stress hormones and boost mood stabilizers, and sessions can have a more immediate effect than many medications.

Classes for therapeutic movement and self-care help to release endorphins, improve the connection between the body and mind, and lower stress hormones. They can also address the ways in which mood disorders can cause the body to curl forward in distress. Uncurling then allows the body to take deeper breaths, find its own internal support system, and feel energized.

Counseling provides one on one assessment and support for mood disorders. Walk and Talk sessions allow the body and mind to process while in motion, Mindfulness Coaching provides tools for cultivating awareness and perspective, and Ayurvedic Nutritional Counseling can help address constitutional imbalances.

Depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders are complex issues that affect the whole body and mind. Treatment that addresses whole system imbalances and brings the body back into a state of rest and healing can help stabilize mood and promote a general sense of wellbeing.

Diabetes Support

Diabetes is a stressful and common condition that requires constant management. It puts tremendous strain on the physical body, and elevates mental and emotional stress levels. Creating health and support for diabetes means treating the body systems that are under strain and reducing overall stress levels so that you can switch the nervous system out of fight or flight mode and into rest and repair mode.

Bodywork and massage increases the circulation of blood and lymph, which brings oxygen and nutrients to tissues and boosts insulin uptake. It also calms the nervous system, helping to turn off the alarms, and is effective at treating the stiffness and mobility issues caused by high blood sugar levels.

Mindfulness practice helps to both lower blood sugar levels and to better self-manage diabetes. In one study, 16 weeks of practice improved mood, lowered stress, addressed sleep issues, and decreased fasting blood sugar levels.

Therapeutic Movement classes like yoga provide the physical activity needed to increase circulation, especially to the arms and legs, where people with diabetes most have issues. Regular physical activity also helps the body improve its response to insulin, and helps directly lower blood sugar levels by reducing stress hormones in the body.

Acupuncture is able to reduce the nerve pain and neuropathy that can come from diabetes. It also helps to lower blood sugar levels, and to regulate the urge to eat too much, drink too much, and pee too often. Overall, it helps to rebalance and support the many physical systems under strain from diabetes.

The constant management of diabetes means that you are in an ongoing conversation with your body about its health status on a daily basis. There are ways to have that conversation and to reduce the strain and stress of this condition through health care that also increases your overall sense of wellbeing and supports your whole self. All of these therapies, including bodywork, mindfulness, therapeutic movement classes, and acupuncture, work with the care of your doctor to improve health and quality of life.

Cupping Therapy Plays Well with Others

Cupping therapy is an important part of our integrative health practice because it supports the process of many of our treatments. I talked with several of our talented therapists about how it complements the work that they do. Every session of Ha.Lé Bodywork is adjusted to meet the needs of the client in the moment. For example, our therapists may take a sports massage focus for highly active bodies, a therapeutic or medical massage focus to treat pain and structure issues, or a lymphatic focus to move fluids and support the healing process. Often a combination of techniques are used, and cupping therapy helps support many of these treatment goals.

Sports bodywork:

Cupping therapy helps to jump start myofascial release. The negative pressure of the suction combined with movement gives a different sensation than other myofascial techniques and helps the muscle reset itself to where it needs to be because the fascia has released. It is a great complement to other techniques and can sometimes create shifts that provide instant relief and allow chronic problems to just fade away.

Therapeutic bodywork:

Using cupping therapy after an Ashiatsu treatment really helps to bring the blood flow to the area, especially any area that is feeling stagnant, like the back or arm. The suction also helps to release the muscle when it is contracting, making for a faster release and bringing blood flow more quickly to the area. Afterward, people tend to feel either really energized or like they just ran a marathon.

Lymphatic bodywork:

Cupping can be very effective in helping to break up scar tissue that is impeding lymph flow, but it is not usually indicated for treating lymphadema or other lymphatic issues directly because it can be too aggressive for the lymph system. However, cupping works through the use of negative pressure, and there is ongoing conversation in the lymphatic massage community as we learn more about how to use cups and other negative pressure tools gently enough to support the lymphatic system.

Acupuncture:

Cupping facilitates better movement of blood and qi in an acupuncture treatment because of the openness of the tissue. The cups create negative pressure, as compared with massage, which uses positive pressure. This negative pressure opens up muscle and tissue, which works in concert with acupuncture needles to move qi.

Health Tips for Jet Lag and Travel

The keys to taking care of your body while traveling are hydration, combating insomnia, and body comfort. We’ve asked some of our expert team how to best support the body through travel. Here is what they said:

Acupuncture AppleAcupuncture: These three acupressure points will help support your body through jet lag and travel weariness:

Stomach 36: Stretch legs out in front of you and place a pillow under your knees. Place the fingers of your right hand directly under the left kneecap. Just under the little finger, about a thumb’s distance from the shin bone you will find a little hollow place. That is S 36. Apply gentle even pressure for about a couple minutes and repeat on the other side.

Xin Bao 6: Find the wrist crease on the palm side of the left hand. Measure 2 thumb widths from the crease. The point is located between the tendons. Apply gentle pressure with the tip of the thumb for a minute or so. Repeat on the other side.

Ren 6: Lie comfortably on your back. Place the first 3 fingers of your left hand directly below your navel. With your right hand, place your index finger directly below your navel right next to your 3rd finger. Massage this point for a couple of minutes.

 

Woman On Yoga BolsterYoga and Therapeutic Movement:  When you come back from a trip, remember that there are 2 parts to a really good yoga practice: the physical, and what I call telling the truth. Physically, prioritize getting sleep, listen to your body, and allow a couple of days on either side of the trip to settle back in and recalibrate before you go back to your usual schedule.

A yoga posture that is especially helpful is a gentle forward fold, where you stand with your sitting bones on the wall, walk your feet forward 12-18 inches from the wall, and then bend forward. This has elements of child’s pose as you lay along your thighs, allowing you to breathe into your back a bit. Also helpful are gentle twists, inversions, downward dog, and cat-cow for spinal releasing.

For the second part, Telling the Truth, find a person that can hear you and is present for you where you are. Have a conversation about your trip and anything that shifted, or realizations, or experiences. Trips can often rearrange us a little and it is very grounding to connect with your people when you come back.

 

Various spices and herbsAyurveda & Nutrition:

Take Ashwaganda, which is a rejuvenate and helps with the way travel throws off the body’s biochemistry. Take it the night before and then while traveling, especially to help sleep. (available at HaLe’)

Take Triphala, which helps fix constipation, assists with detoxification, and regulates the bowels. (available at HaLe’)

Drink lots of water, and in summer, put things in the water like cucumber or mint to help cool your body.

Do dry massage: take a dry washcloth before you get in the bath and start at your ankles, brushing up toward the heart to get circulation going. This is especially good for when you’ve been sitting a long time.

 

zen stones jy wooden banch on the beach near sea. OutdoorBodywork: Biochemical processes don’t move as fast as we can travel, so the body needs support in catching up.

Help reset your sleep cycle with exposure to natural sun for at least 20 min. Using a natural sleep aid such as melatonin can also help.

Balance the hips and release the neck and shoulders because those can get compacted during travel.

We need to stay more hydrated than usual. Coconut water and bottled spring water are especially good. 

Diet-wise, eat bananas and maybe some nuts. Avoid fatty foods, spicy foods, dairy, and caffeine.

Take an epsom salt bath with a little lavender or something in it that rejuvenates to help with travel weariness. 

Now about those needles…

by Katherine Casey, LAc

If you have never had any experience with acupuncture before, you are probably concerned about the needles. This is understandable, because the only needles we are familiar with are hypodermic needles, which are hollow-bodied, and designed to either take something out of us (blood), or put something in us (medication). Neither experience is ever very pleasant!

Acupuncture needles are completely different from hypodermic needles. They are very thin, solid body (meaning, they aren’t hollow like hypodermic needles are), and they serve the purpose of delivering a message. They direct qi (that animating force that keeps us alive, pronounced “chi”) to do something, like “go over here and nourish the lungs because this body has a bad cold.”

Another concern people often have about acupuncture needles is whether or not they are reused. And the answer to this is an unequivocal and emphatic NO. Acupuncture needles arrive from the supplier in sterile packaging, and they are single use only, just like hypodermic needles. They are disposed of in a sharps container just like the ones found in doctors’ offices and hospitals. Acupuncture needles are never, ever reused.

What is Cupping Therapy?

by Katherine Casey, LAc

The history of cupping is documented in the medical histories of many parts of the world, including countries of Africa, Europe, the Middle East, as well as Asian countries. Cupping is the practice of applying specially designed cups to the skin using suction for the purpose of relieving muscle pain, reducing swelling, and increasing the circulation of blood and qi to an injured area. It can be used to assist in lymphatic drainage and in reducing cellulite. Cupping can also aid in alleviating digestive issues, such as constipation. Facial cupping can aid in the reduction of fine lines and facial puffiness.

Historically all kinds of items were used for cupping– animal horns, bamboo, stone, and sea shells are some of the materials used for cupping. Nowadays, in the modern clinic setting specially designed glass cups are used, as well as cups made of polycarbonate plastic or silicone, all of which can be easily cleaned after use.

How does it work? In order to answer this question let’s compare massage therapy and cupping. Massage therapy creates “positive pressure” by compressing tissue to relieve muscle tension. In constrast, cupping uses suction to create “negative pressure.” The suction action of cupping expands and opens up the layers of body tissue, allowing better circulation of blood and qi.

Cupping will often leave round marks, commonly referred to as bruises, though the marks are not true bruises, like those that occur from a compression injury. The marks gradually disappear a few days after treatment.

What is Acupuncture and How Does It Work?

by Katherine Casey, LAc

Just as there is a blood circulatory system, there is also a circulatory system for energy, or qi (pronounced chi). Qi flows continuously in a channel system, just like blood flows continuously in the circulatory system. The distribution of blood and qi throughout the body brings nourishment to all of its organs and systems, right down to the cellular level, and supports all of its functions.

Along these channels are acupuncture points, each with a unique property and purpose. A combination of points is selected by the practitioner according to the needs of the client receiving the acupuncture treatment. Placing needles in these acupuncture points serves to deliver a message to the qi flowing in the channels–perhaps to nourish a part of the body that has been injured, or to nourish an organ that is in a state of deficiency. For example, if the client has a cold, this would indicate a deficiency in the lungs. The points selected for treatment would address this deficiency, sending a message for the qi to support the lungs and bring them back to a healthier state.

The body’s natural state is one of health, but we sometimes find ourselves out of that natural state due to the stresses of daily life. Sleep patterns, diet, exercise, stress caused by working environments and life events, all have an effect on the state of our health. The objective of acupuncture is to bring the body back to that natural state of health, by supporting its own self healing capabilities. The acupuncture practitioner and the client are equal partners in this healing process.

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