Emotional Healing that Starts in the Body

Emotional and physical healing are intertwined. Physical issues can have emotional consequences like depression or anxiety, and the opposite is also true. Strong emotions can become stored in the body, often as tension, pain, or dysfunction.

When you receive bodywork and massage or engage in a self-care practice like yoga, the release of stress and muscle tension can also bring an emotional release. Often, but not always, this release brings up negative feelings that you may have pushed back, like fear, sadness, or anger. This can be a shifting point in your healing process! Even though it is painful to experience old emotions, this can be what you need to get to the other side.

Teachers and bodyworkers are not trained or licensed to provide the therapeutic processing that a mental health counselor could, but they can do a lot to create an opportunity for deep emotional healing. They may slow down or stop the physical process of your session or class in order to let the full emotional release move through. Taking full deep breaths will also help your body release the stored energy on its own, and so they may remind you to breathe. Usually you will calm down after a few minutes, and then be able to rejoin the class or return to the flow of your bodywork treatment.

There is true wisdom in saying, “I need support.” Emotional energy is a factor in our health and our healing process, and feeling safe to release emotional energy can help in so many ways. Having someone just be present and supportive by your side can be exactly what you need.

Hygge is another word for WellBeing

Hygge (hoo-gah) is a Danish word that is hard to translate but easy to feel. It is a lifestyle dedicated to coziness in its broadest sense, where you are relaxed and feeling as at-home as possible. It is about being kind to yourself with small, delightful things like warm drinks, candlelight, good company, and comforting food.

At its core, hygge is about self-care. It is about indulging a little so that you are not punishing or denying yourself anything, but being kinder to yourself. Winter is especially the season of hygge, when the dark and the cold send us searching for warmth and light. The word itself is probably related to the English word “hug”, and they both speak of feeling comforted and secure.

HaLe’ is a form of hygge. Attend our classes and come for massage and other therapies in order to cherish yourself through a sometimes difficult season. Self-care of the body mind addresses aches and pains, relieves tension and stress, helps prevent injury, and improves digestion and sleep. In other words, it helps you feel more comfortable in your own skin, bringing that sense of comfort and ease that is hygge.

Healing in Community

from Janice Cathey & Jane House

Are we evolving, moving toward our higher selves? Our practice is important. It is revolutionary. When we are in living practice, we are asked to turn inward and meet ourselves. We turn inward and we breathe. We ask, what more can we do, what more can I do?

It starts with a singular, Am I taking care of myself? When we take care of our own well being, it sets the stage and grounds us to be able to contend with life. Life can be intense. That intensity has a way of seeping into our daily lives. It constricts the way that we behave in the world and though we may not realize it at first, over time that feeling of constriction results in something bigger than we knew; bigger than we were paying attention to.

A living practice helps us pay attention and to look within. Imagine a diver, diving inward to do the research, asking how do I feel right now, and how is my body? The body is not object; we are living organisms all co-creating our life together.

When we start having those conversations with ourselves, we can then start having those conversations with each other. When we have those conversations with each other, we create community. If we can come together and listen, come together with understanding, then perhaps we will grow our compassion. Compassion not only for others, but for ourselves, and for ourselves when we feel discomfort.

We are not a one size fits all culture. As we each develop our living practice of being fully engaged, participating, collaborating, and striving to live fully, we ask: What does it feel like to live in your life’s purpose? What does it feel like to live in vitality? We hope that HaLe’ can be a safe place for that practice of engagement, as we provide tools to both nourish and play.

Emotional Benefits of Yoga and Massage

Profound emotional release and calm can come through massage, bodywork, yoga, and gentle movement. Here is what some of our team members have to say about this process from their own experience and practices:

I’ve heard it said that the body never lies, and also that the body is faster than the mind. If this is true, we must honor our bodies and allow them to speak truth to us because they will know in their cells faster than we do in our minds. Yoga and body work provide safe environments in which we can be fully vulnerable, face our fears, and come to know our true selves. And our true selves can never be annihilated, they are infinite and eternal and we can rest easily when we remember and feel this. -Erin Law, Massage and Cupping Therapist

Stress, fear, anger, and other negative emotions stimulate our sympathetic nervous system, which is our fight or flight response. This causes our muscles to tense, and we have a higher respiration rate and higher heart rate than normal. Massage, bodywork, deep breathing, and gentle motion stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, which is our repose system. This counteracts the effects that come from thoughts of the future being different from what we anticipated. Also, positive touch and things that feel good stimulate the brain chemistry to bring deeper sleep, clearer thoughts, and movement toward a better emotional space. -Adie Grey MacKenzie, Massage Therapist

Yoga is considered by researchers to be the best evidence-based movement for stress reduction.  As we thoughtfully, intentionally, powerfully and beautifully move through the poses and the moving meditation that yoga provides, we move energy within and around us.  As we send breath, self-compassion, and strength during yoga to those places in us that are feeling unease or suffering, we create calm and quiet.  Our physical systems slow down and experience increased calm, our minds quiet, and we are better able to discern with wisdom and clarity what we need to do for ourselves and for others. Practicing yoga in community often creates comfort and a sense of belonging with others who are like-minded and like-spirited.  -Janice Glasscock, LCSW Psychotherapist

The practice of yoga is about finding equanimity and balance regardless of what is occurring around you.  Through an asana practice, one develops a stillness in one’s state of mind throughout the activity.  Just by doing the practice – the benefits of this ease and stillness awaits you. -Nancy Kirkland, Yoga Instructor

During this time of societal change, which may create turbulent and tumultuous feelings of uncertainty, yoga can be grounding and centering, and massage can support our emotional equilibrium.

Behavioral Health for Mind, Body, and Spirit Care

from Janice Glasscock, LCSW

Behavioral health care and mental health care focus on thought processes and emotions, on personal narrative, and helping the mind communicate with the brain. This allows us to better understand our own stories and feelings so that we can make better decisions and act towards healing.

Behavioral and mental health care is especially useful for people in situations that feel stuck, full of loss or fear, and/or during large transitions. These situations can include an unhealthy pattern in a relationship, moving into new parenthood, and launching children from home. They can also be about dealing with a life threatening health condition or diagnosis, stage of life transitions like aging or health concerns, work place or work relationship concerns, or the loss of a significant relationship.

Approximately 67% of people with behavioral or mental health concerns do not receive treatment, and these concerns account for about half of disability days from work. Depression is the #1 condition currently affecting health care costs right now, and it has a global and pervasive impact on health issues and conditions.

We can improve our overall sense of well-being, health, and quality of life by paying attention to our behavioral and mental health as a part of our mind, body, and spirit interplay. This means paying attention to our thinking and cognitive processes, and to our decisions and actions. Strong behavioral and mental health helps with:

  • positive, effective work and personal relationships
  • good life choices and lifestyle development
  • physical health/well-being
  • handling natural ups and downs of life, and coping during life crises
  • self-discovery and personal growth

Psychotherapy as treatment for behavioral and mental health concerns is an evidence-based way to reduce depression and anxiety and more effectively cope and problem solve. It has long-lasting benefits, and helps to address chronic low and high levels of stress that are on-going contributors to compromised health and well-being.

Within a positive, safe, and constructive relationship with a professional, psychotherapy helps identify and better understand cognitive sources of unease, and to change/broaden thinking about both the problems of daily living and the catastrophic, all-consuming psychological and emotional crises from which we need recovery. It is a great modality to help us take action on the paths of healing.