Breema Brings Deep Nurturing and Wholeness

Breema is a set of techniques based on 9 Principles of Harmony. It does not require mental beliefs, only attention to the experience of the body. It provides a way to feel nurtured, rather than drained, by your experiences and relationships.

Breema can be done as self-care, done with a partner, and received as a bodywork. It uses simple forms of natural body movement to free your energy for productive work. Our physical energy is consumed by our mind, body and feelings. Conflicts and tension tie up more of that energy than necessary, and restoring harmony makes it available for other things, like our body’s natural healing processes.

As tension and conflict eases, it restores vitality and suppleness. New movements and postures become available. Mind, body, and feelings are able to create new relationships and function more cooperatively. Mood can regulate, stepping out of the cycle of pleasant and unpleasant states so that the mind can return to being a naturally supportive presence to the body.

Breema is done fully clothed on a padded floor, and brings an experience of wholeness. All our lives we don’t include ourselves in our impressions of life, and we think of our body as discrete, labeled parts like hands, arms, liver, heart, etc. By including the whole self and emphasizing that unity of being, Breema creates an experience. When we move into that experience, we remember that we are all part of a whole, our body parts are all part of our whole, and we are able to release tension and conflict in order to return to harmony.

The experience of Breema makes you simpler, not more complicated. Instead of fighting illness, it works to increase vitality. By moving toward harmony, vitality, and wholeness, Breema treatments restore natural function and bring a deep sense of wellbeing.

Focus on Feeling Better: Mind-Body Connection

Our minds and bodies are connected into a single whole, and emotional states express themselves physically in the body. We get butterflies in our stomach when we are nervous, or blush when we are embarrassed. These are easy, momentary examples, but the same kinds of physical reactions happen for chronic stress, depression, anxiety, and other emotions. This means that mental and emotional healthcare is a cornerstone of treating health concerns and supporting overall wellbeing.

On a biological level, there are multiple networks of communication between the mind and the body. When the brain feels an emotion, it is a signal that activates the neurological system, the endocrine system, and the immune system. The body can then move toward readiness to face a threat or relax into rest-and-digest mode. Hormone levels adjust, which can affect your ability to take quick action, to heal, to feel hungry, and to feel tired. Your immune system can also ramp up or down, depending on the situation.

Because of these deep connections, treatment for many health concerns may be most effective when it includes sessions that focus on mental and emotional states specifically. Mindfulness Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics can all have a deep impact on creating health. These treatments each focus on different aspects of supporting a mindfulness practice, addressing possible trauma, developing more positive behavioral health habits, and working with the emotions stored in the body, especially when things feel “stuck”.

The mind-body connection is powerful because there is no real division between the body and the mind. They are both aspects of the same whole, and effective treatment takes this into account. Whether mental and emotional healthcare is addressing a cause of distress, a reaction to distress, or some of both, it is an effective aspect of feeling better and creating health.

Deep Harmony through Being Present

Being present allows the stress of what has happened (past) and what has not yet happened (future) to fall away from the mind. Instead we turn our attention to the present, which is where the body lives. Common, simple techniques focus on the breath or the rhythm of our heartbeat. By shifting our awareness to our physical sensations, we can begin to relax the alarm systems of stress and allow our bodies to turn on the internal systems of nourishment and healing.

There are many ways to cue the body and mind to come into the present, and one of our favorite techniques at HaLé is a gentle, supportive bodywork called Breema. Based on Nine Principles of Harmony, Breema teaches that we best support ourselves and one another by being present in the moment.

Breema combines different nurturing touches to support whole-bodied relaxation and health. This includes stretches to relieve tension along with compression and gentle touch. It also incorporates rhythmic movements and stillness as a way to keep your mind in your body and so in the present moment. Sessions are able to assist with physical flexibility, emotional balance, and mental clarity.

Breema and other forms of mindfulness practice that are based on awareness of the body help support an overall sense of vitality. Being in the present opens us to a sense of joy, connection, and gratitude. This in turn expands our understanding of self and helps us live a more meaningful life.

Emotional Support for the Holiday Season

November and December can be some of the most wonderful and most stressful months of the year. Family closeness, preparing for celebrations, and colder, darker days can all bring depression and anxiety as well as comfort and joy. HaLé has expanded our psychotherapy offerings in time to support you through this potentially difficult time of year.

Susan Dendtler, MA, believes that we are all born with a great capacity for love, creativity, joy, and kindness. She has taught Restorative Yoga classes at HaLé for the last year, and is now seeing psychotherapy clients as well. She specializes in restorative practice and integrating yoga with mental health, and is able to meet each person where they are.

Susie embraces those of different cultures, genders, ages, and sexual orientations, and she is committed to creating a welcoming environment for everyone. She sees individuals and couples to process emotions, heal, and overcome any internal or external barriers to reaching their full expression of self. She has extensive experience working with children, teens and parents who have experienced trauma, grief, and loss, and is certified in Trust Based Relational Interventions and Trauma Informed Care.

Whether you need a little extra support through seasonal anxiety or depression, or have deeper emotions ready for healing, Psychotherapy at HaLé can help provide the emotional nourishment you need for your own health and wellbeing.

Diabetes Support

Diabetes is a stressful and common condition that requires constant management. It puts tremendous strain on the physical body, and elevates mental and emotional stress levels. Creating health and support for diabetes means treating the body systems that are under strain and reducing overall stress levels so that you can switch the nervous system out of fight or flight mode and into rest and repair mode.

Bodywork and massage increases the circulation of blood and lymph, which brings oxygen and nutrients to tissues and boosts insulin uptake. It also calms the nervous system, helping to turn off the alarms, and is effective at treating the stiffness and mobility issues caused by high blood sugar levels.

Mindfulness practice helps to both lower blood sugar levels and to better self-manage diabetes. In one study, 16 weeks of practice improved mood, lowered stress, addressed sleep issues, and decreased fasting blood sugar levels.

Therapeutic Movement classes like yoga provide the physical activity needed to increase circulation, especially to the arms and legs, where people with diabetes most have issues. Regular physical activity also helps the body improve its response to insulin, and helps directly lower blood sugar levels by reducing stress hormones in the body.

Acupuncture is able to reduce the nerve pain and neuropathy that can come from diabetes. It also helps to lower blood sugar levels, and to regulate the urge to eat too much, drink too much, and pee too often. Overall, it helps to rebalance and support the many physical systems under strain from diabetes.

The constant management of diabetes means that you are in an ongoing conversation with your body about its health status on a daily basis. There are ways to have that conversation and to reduce the strain and stress of this condition through health care that also increases your overall sense of wellbeing and supports your whole self. All of these therapies, including bodywork, mindfulness, therapeutic movement classes, and acupuncture, work with the care of your doctor to improve health and quality of life.

Relief for Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a common source of joint pain, caused by wear on the protective cartilage cushioning the ends of the bones of the joint. It can start at any age, and by age 60, most adults have some arthritis. The bones most often affected are in the hands, spine, knee, and hip joints. Bodywork and massage, movement classes like yoga, and mindfulness practice can all help with the pain, stiffness, swelling, and decreased range of motion of osteoarthritis.

Part of osteoarthritis is that collagenous tissue will settle in to create a patchwork of scars that creates a lot of stiffness, and bodywork is effective at helping to restore that lost range of motion. It also works to realign posture, which relieves strain on affected joints, and decreases swelling. Additionally, massage and bodywork reduces pain by directly impacting the nerves of the affected joints.

When it comes to movement classes, the general rule for students with osteoarthritis is: if it hurts, stop and do it a different way. The benefits of yoga and other therapeutic classes include increased mobility, balance, and range of motion, all of which help to reduce arthritis pain. Everything done in class can be modified to accommodate physical issues, so if any pose or motion is uncomfortable, let the teacher know so they show you another way.

Mindfulness techniques are also proven to help treat people with osteoarthritis. They retrain the brain away from focusing on pain and thereby magnifying it and making it worse. The effects of mindfulness practice are cumulative; the more often you do it, the more it helps.

Osteoarthritis may be a common cause of pain, stiffness, and discomfort, but it is possible to feel significantly better through treatment. Supporting your health through bodywork, therapeutic movement classes, and mindfulness can improve both your symptoms and your overall sense of wellbeing.

Treatments for Autoimmune Disorders

There are over 80 kinds of autoimmune disorders, where the body is either attacking itself and causing physical problems in the organ or system it is attacking, or where it is creating excessive amounts of inflammation. Treatment focuses mostly on symptom management, and bodywork, movement classes, and mindfulness are all effective at treating autoimmune symptoms.

Bodywork supports clients with autoimmune disorders by reducing levels of inflammation and irritation. It helps move the body out of fight or flight mode and into rest and restore mode, which supports nutrient flow and reduces stress on organ systems like the adrenals. It also releases muscle tension and aches, which in turn helps to ease strain on the spine and joints. Bodywork sessions are able to be uniquely customized for specific disorders to support affected tissues, treat secondary symptoms, and move lymph fluid.

Movement classes like yoga and qigong also help treat autoimmune disorders by helping to lower immune response and inflammation in the body. The physical activity of the class helps to quell inflammation and reduce levels of stress hormones in the body. The mental awareness and focus of the classes support a sense of calm and well being, which helps relax the accumulated mental stress of a chronic condition.

Finally, Mindfulness is also effective treatment for autoimmune disorders. It is a proven method for reducing pain and discomfort, as it is able to turn down the volume on pain signals from the body. In the case of autoimmune disorders, this shift then sends a “cooling” message to the body’s inflammatory response, helping it to subside and come back into balance.

Autoimmune disorders are often chronic conditions that impact daily life in difficult and painful ways. At HaLé, we see firsthand how treatment through bodywork, movement classes, and mindfulness is able to help reduce pain, reduce inflammation, and improve quality of life.

How Mindfulness Reduces Pain

Mindfulness is a specific form of meditation that has been proven to reduce pain. Clinical trials have shown it to reduce chronic pain by 57%, and accomplished meditators can achieve even higher levels of pain relief. Other studies have shown that it does not use the body’s own natural production of opioids or endorphins to accomplish these reductions, so how does it work?

The practice of mindfulness brings quiet, focused attention to the body and its sensations. Typical exercises help you observe with the mind’s eye, and just notice what is happening. When we are in pain, our minds spend a lot of time thinking about it, trying to solve it, and worrying if it will ever end. Mindfulness allows you to observe painful sensations as you feel them, and quiet the mind’s reactions and struggle.

This process has the biological effect of soothing the brain patterns of your pain perception. With regular mindfulness practice, these changes will alter the structure of the brain itself so that pain is not felt with the same intensity.

This works because there are two layers to the perception of pain. First, there is the sensation of the illness, injury, or damage to the body that is causing the pain. Second, there is the brain’s reaction to this sensation. The brain is trying to protect the body from further damage or injury and so it focuses on the sensations of pain. This effectively turns up the “volume” and increases suffering. For chronic pain, this process becomes a feedback loop, and the brain gets better and better at feeling more pain.

Mindfulness practice effectively turns the volume back down again, so that the brain does not amplify the pain signals the body is sending. This in turn reduces the pain-related anxiety, stress, and depression, and creates room for the body to begin to relax and then heal.

8 Ways to be More Mindful at Work

There are many ways to incorporate mindfulness throughout your work day, and you only need a few minutes at a time. Here are 8 ideas to get you started:

1. Take a moment when you wake up: Take 2 minutes to just notice your breath when you first wake up. We release the most stress hormones right after waking up, as our thoughts about our day provoke fight-or-flight responses.

2. Take 10 min in the car or at your desk: Spend the first 5-10 min of your work day just paying attention to your breath. When you find your mind distracted, release the distraction and return attention to your breath. Many things will compete for your attention throughout the work day; for these few minutes, your attention is entirely your own.

3. Pause between meetings: Take a minute or two to practice mindfulness at the beginning of each meeting to boost your focus and effectiveness.

4. Single-task: When we multi-task, our brain switches rapidly from one task to another, often losing information each time. Try to group similar tasks together and do one task at a time as much as possible.

5. Connect with your senses: Up to 47% of our day is spent on autopilot, thinking about something other than what we are doing. Come back to your senses, sight, sound, smell, etc. in order to stay more present and aware.

6. Use reminders: Every time your phone rings or dings, take a mindful breath. Or set an alarm to go off every hour to cue a minute of mindfulness. Place a small sign or note in your workspace to remind you.

7. Practice gratitude: Humans have a negativity bias, where we naturally focus on problems. Deliberately find things that are going well in order to boost creativity, health, work relationships, and the quality of your work.

8. Accept what you can’t change: Being mindful means accepting the present moment as it is, and yourself as you are now. Once you accept what is happening, you can move forward with next steps and learning from any mistakes.

What Really Works for Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to the doctor, and there are new guidelines on how to treat it. Researchers analyzed more than 150 studies to understand what really works and what doesn’t. The conclusion: instead of medication, try yoga, massage, or mindfulness.

These guidelines, published by the American College of Physicians on Feb 13, 2017, say to use techniques that speed up the healing process to relax muscles, joints and tendons. This can be done through massage, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation, as well as mind-body therapies like yoga, tai chi, and mindfulness-based stress reduction.

This new recommendation is in alignment with the new CDC & FDA guidelines for the usage of opiods, which are now known to be inappropriate for chronic pain management. It instead recommends trying massage, yoga, and mindfulness first, then NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen to reduce inflammation. Acetaminophen is not recommended, since it does not reduce pain or inflammation.

Low back pain is common, and the way it is currently treated in medical settings is a good example of low value health care: expensive tests and therapies that don’t fix the problem. Moving to more effective treatments for both acute and chronic conditions by recommending yoga, massage, and mindfulness will help reduce suffering in patients and frustration in those who treat them.

At HaLe’, our manual medicine therapists and our self-care class instructors are experienced in treating low back pain. For regular aches and injuries, we recommend you come to class or make an appointment. For more severe conditions, please talk with us so we can guide you to the right treatment plan for your body.