Treating Pain with Integrative Health Care

from Janice Cathey

Two weeks ago we discussed Dr Jackson’s TED talk about the inadequacy of opioid drugs and surgery for addressing chronic pain. Last week we talked about Central Sensitization, a biological process where pain modifies the way the nervous system works, making things hurt worse than they should and pain last longer than it should.

As the health care field grows its understanding of where pain comes from and how we need to change our approach to treating it, it is our great honor to be care providers in relationship to individuals.  HaLe’ is grassroots, which means we are growing an innovative way, building from modern research and ancient modalities to better cope and deal with health issues.

Evidence shows that only 20% of medical issues can be 100% dealt with by the medical field. We have a great regard and respect for what surgery and medicines and other western medical practices can do for us, and want them available for ourselves, our families, and others. Yet there is so much more to health than what western medicine can fully treat.

What we do is collaborate and partner, drawing understanding of the body’s dynamic response that happens daily in our practice. Every time a person comes in and connects with their breath­­, when there is movement, when there is connection, then there is a dynamic response that happens. We are not bringing people a shallow patina of “feel better”; we are delivering a systematic method of health and well being that is accessible to every single person no matter what your age, medical history, or where you come from.

Integrative medicine is not a new way of treating health and wellness; it is an objective. It increases connectivity for an individual because that is what integration is. This is not about one system of the body, but about many systems working in unison for the betterment of whole health. There is a bottom up response coming from the patient as they demand care on a holistic level, and that broader scope is where the care paradigm begins to switch. We are here to provide support and create space for that to happen.

Health is a dynamic system of balance and counterbalance that is complex and interconnected. Every person should walk away feeling better than when they came in our door. Even when you aren’t feeling bad, there is still room to feel better and to engage in the processes of health.

Health Tips for Jet Lag and Travel

The keys to taking care of your body while traveling are hydration, combating insomnia, and body comfort. We’ve asked some of our expert team how to best support the body through travel. Here is what they said:

Acupuncture AppleKatherine Casey, Acupuncturist: These three acupressure points will help support your body through jet lag and travel weariness:

Stomach 36: Stretch legs out in front of you and place a pillow under your knees. Place the fingers of your right hand directly under the left kneecap. Just under the little finger, about a thumb’s distance from the shin bone you will find a little hollow place. That is S 36. Apply gentle even pressure for about a couple minutes and repeat on the other side.

Xin Bao 6: Find the wrist crease on the palm side of the left hand. Measure 2 thumb widths from the crease. The point is located between the tendons. Apply gentle pressure with the tip of the thumb for a minute or so. Repeat on the other side.

Ren 6: Lie comfortably on your back. Place the first 3 fingers of your left hand directly below your navel. With your right hand, place your index finger directly below your navel right next to your 3rd finger. Massage this point for a couple of minutes.

 

Woman On Yoga BolsterJane House, Yoga Teacher:  When you come back from a trip, remember that there are 2 parts to a really good yoga practice: the physical, and what I call telling the truth. Physically, prioritize getting sleep, listen to your body, and allow a couple of days on either side of the trip to settle back in and recalibrate before you go back to your usual schedule.

A yoga posture that is especially helpful is a gentle forward fold, where you stand with your sitting bones on the wall, walk your feet forward 12-18 inches from the wall, and then bend forward. This has elements of child’s pose as you lay along your thighs, allowing you to breathe into your back a bit. Also helpful are gentle twists, inversions, downward dog, and cat-cow for spinal releasing.

For the second part, Telling the Truth, find a person that can hear you and is present for you where you are. Have a conversation about your trip and anything that shifted, or realizations, or experiences. Trips can often rearrange us a little and it is very grounding to connect with your people when you come back.

 

Various spices and herbsLiz Workman Mead, Ayurvedic & Nutritional Counselor:

Take Ashwaganda, which is a rejuvenate and helps with the way travel throws off the body’s biochemistry. Take it the night before and then while traveling, especially to help sleep. (available at HaLe’)

Take Triphala, which helps fix constipation, assists with detoxification, and regulates the bowels. (available at HaLe’)

Drink lots of water, and in summer, put things in the water like cucumber or mint to help cool your body.

Do dry massage: take a dry washcloth before you get in the bath and start at your ankles, brushing up toward the heart to get circulation going. This is especially good for when you’ve been sitting a long time.

 

zen stones jy wooden banch on the beach near sea. OutdoorJanice Cathey, Bodyworker: Biochemical processes don’t move as fast as we can travel, so the body needs support in catching up.

Help reset your sleep cycle with exposure to natural sun for at least 20 min. Using a natural sleep aid such as melatonin can also help.

Balance the hips and release the neck and shoulders because those can get compacted during travel.

We need to stay more hydrated than usual. Coconut water and bottled spring water are especially good. 

Diet-wise, eat bananas and maybe some nuts. Avoid fatty foods, spicy foods, dairy, and caffeine.

Take an epsom salt bath with a little lavender or something in it that rejuvenates to help with travel weariness. 

Psychology of Muscle

 

Your muscles take on the shape that they are accustomed to being in for hours every day. Any one thing, any repetitive motion, will shape the muscle and shape the fascia that surrounds it. The body responds so that the form follows the function, or that the function will make the form. What we want, then, is for our bodies to assume variable positions and activities throughout the day and throughout our life.

 

Changing positions can be challenging, though. It takes more than stretching to release a muscle, and we can’t force ourselves into a position when our body isn’t ready. Muscle fibers require a neurological signal in the form of a chemical messenger in order to release, and even though that signal comes from the brain, we don’t necessarily decide if our brain will send that signal. We can’t just tell our hamstrings to be less tight. What needs to happen is that the brain needs to feel that it is safe enough for that muscle to release.

 

So don’t over-stretch yourself into being over-burdened and overcommitted. Dive into a conversation with yourself, befriend yourself, and gain an understanding of what your end stretch is and how much you can take on. There are times when we can take on a whole lot, and life circumstances change and we can take on even more. But nothing is constant, everything ebbs and flows, and it is our responsibility to listen to that ebb and flow and know if we need to back off or engage. What you did last spring may be very different from what you can do this spring, but if we go in with hearts wide open we can find opportunity.

 

Stay buoyant and responsive to where you and your body are in the process of holding and changing positions. We can’t force these processes, but we can work with them by knowing the parts of ourselves.

Stress Release

stress release

When we allow ourselves to rest and to receive,
we give ourselves permission to let go,
and that is the very heart of stress release.
We can then start the untangling
of bound thought patterns, tissue fibers, and ideas about ourselves.
Stress release can happen in a moment, in a flash, in seconds,
and you know when it happens.
We recognize it.
To find stress release, you only need to show up, to arrive,
into our culture of care at Ha.Le’.

Don’t wait until life settles down; you are not going to get less busy.

The Purpose of Yoga

Yoga is for self-fulfillment.
Yoga practice is about self-awareness.
It serves a purpose to balance misunderstandings and misperceptions.
It develops the knowing, the clarity, and the being, increasing accuracy in knowing yourself.
Yoga is a view or perspective, and it can help change your perspective.
Yoga can be your greatest self-help guide as you learn how to reduce your suffering and come out of suffering.

Yoga is also movement, and it gives attention to the direction you are headed.
It is about yoking together and bringing together the elements of self-control that direct the activity of the mind, bringing us a more peaceful and more balanced feeling.

Beauty Speaks to Us

When we see beauty,
it is something that speaks to us
on a level that takes us to
another space and time.
It can elicit peace,
or translate into a conversation
with self or others.
It is a relationship.

There is a connection between the visual arts and the healing arts. Ha.Le’ is interested in the arts in all forms and wants to help make them accessible and available.

That is why we are so glad to be working with Giving Art a Home, a local philanthropic arts organization dedicated to connecting deserving community members with original art by local artists in a way that honors both recipients and artists. Giving Art a Home is responsible for the wonderful art that graces our walls, and all art sales from the exhibitions at Ha.Le’ both support the artist and this very worthy organization.

Allow Grace

allow grace
We all have ideas about how we would like to look and feel in our bodies, and in this season of New Year’s Resolutions, it is easy to become extra critical and impatient with ourselves.
This year, allow yourself some Grace.
We all need grace and space to develop. Some things can take a long time to process, so please give yourself that time. Instead of judging yourself and others, allow time to transition, and trust yourself and your therapists to get you where you need to be.

Happy New Year,

Janice Cathey