Health Tips for Jet Lag and Travel

The keys to taking care of your body while traveling are hydration, combating insomnia, and body comfort. We’ve asked some of our expert team how to best support the body through travel. Here is what they said:

Acupuncture AppleKatherine Casey, Acupuncturist: These three acupressure points will help support your body through jet lag and travel weariness:

Stomach 36: Stretch legs out in front of you and place a pillow under your knees. Place the fingers of your right hand directly under the left kneecap. Just under the little finger, about a thumb’s distance from the shin bone you will find a little hollow place. That is S 36. Apply gentle even pressure for about a couple minutes and repeat on the other side.

Xin Bao 6: Find the wrist crease on the palm side of the left hand. Measure 2 thumb widths from the crease. The point is located between the tendons. Apply gentle pressure with the tip of the thumb for a minute or so. Repeat on the other side.

Ren 6: Lie comfortably on your back. Place the first 3 fingers of your left hand directly below your navel. With your right hand, place your index finger directly below your navel right next to your 3rd finger. Massage this point for a couple of minutes.

 

Woman On Yoga BolsterJane House, Yoga Teacher:  When you come back from a trip, remember that there are 2 parts to a really good yoga practice: the physical, and what I call telling the truth. Physically, prioritize getting sleep, listen to your body, and allow a couple of days on either side of the trip to settle back in and recalibrate before you go back to your usual schedule.

A yoga posture that is especially helpful is a gentle forward fold, where you stand with your sitting bones on the wall, walk your feet forward 12-18 inches from the wall, and then bend forward. This has elements of child’s pose as you lay along your thighs, allowing you to breathe into your back a bit. Also helpful are gentle twists, inversions, downward dog, and cat-cow for spinal releasing.

For the second part, Telling the Truth, find a person that can hear you and is present for you where you are. Have a conversation about your trip and anything that shifted, or realizations, or experiences. Trips can often rearrange us a little and it is very grounding to connect with your people when you come back.

 

Various spices and herbsLiz Workman Mead, Ayurvedic & Nutritional Counselor:

Take Ashwaganda, which is a rejuvenate and helps with the way travel throws off the body’s biochemistry. Take it the night before and then while traveling, especially to help sleep. (available at HaLe’)

Take Triphala, which helps fix constipation, assists with detoxification, and regulates the bowels. (available at HaLe’)

Drink lots of water, and in summer, put things in the water like cucumber or mint to help cool your body.

Do dry massage: take a dry washcloth before you get in the bath and start at your ankles, brushing up toward the heart to get circulation going. This is especially good for when you’ve been sitting a long time.

 

zen stones jy wooden banch on the beach near sea. OutdoorJanice Cathey, Bodyworker: Biochemical processes don’t move as fast as we can travel, so the body needs support in catching up.

Help reset your sleep cycle with exposure to natural sun for at least 20 min. Using a natural sleep aid such as melatonin can also help.

Balance the hips and release the neck and shoulders because those can get compacted during travel.

We need to stay more hydrated than usual. Coconut water and bottled spring water are especially good. 

Diet-wise, eat bananas and maybe some nuts. Avoid fatty foods, spicy foods, dairy, and caffeine.

Take an epsom salt bath with a little lavender or something in it that rejuvenates to help with travel weariness. 

Ayurveda: How to Be Healthy for You

Ayurveda is the oldest form of medicine. It teaches us that everyone has a different constitution, and what works for one person doesn’t work for another. A lot of times people compare themselves to others and try to do what they did in order to get the same results. We might eat a lot of carbs, or eat a lot of protein, or eat according to various fads and diets, and then we wonder why other people got the results we wanted, but we did not.

We are each born with a specific constitution, and it doesn’t change. Even twins will have different constitutions. Once you know your constitution, you can figure out what’s better for your body. Ayurveda simplifies the guessing game because it tells you more about what will work and takes the pressure out of how to stay healthy.

We can feel so confused by health and it gets overwhelming. Ayurveda works, and is not a fad diet but a different way of understanding your own unique body, which is what separates it from all these other options. Find your constitution, find what works best for you, and fix your imbalances based on what is right for your body. Ayurveda teaches how to be healthy for you.

Ayurvedic Cleanse Recipe: Tridoshic Kitchari

Tridoshic Kitchari is a stew type meal that is prepared from basmati rice and split mung dal. During a cleanse, appropriate vegetables provide texture, flavor, and an important source of fiber. Kitchari is very easy to digest, which makes it a wonderful food for any cleansing regimen. It allows the digestive system to rest, allocating extra energy to the body’s natural detoxification processes. The quantities in this recipe provide a good starting point for a day’s supply of kitchari, but as you learn your preferences and habits, you are welcome to adjust the quantities to better fit your needs.

Ingredients

• 1 cup white basmati rice

• 1/2 cup yellow mung dal

• 2 tablespoons ghee

• Spices (or 1 tablespoon kitchari spice mix)

• 1/4 teaspoon black mustard seeds

• 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds

• 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder

• 1 1/2 teaspoons coriander powder

• 1/2 teaspoon fennel powder

• 1 pinch hing (asafoetida)

• 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

• 1 teaspoon natural mineral salt

• 6 cups water

• 2 cups easily digestible vegetables (such as asparagus, carrots, celery, green beans, summer

squash, sweet potato, or zucchini)

Soak the split mung dal overnight (or for at least four hours). Strain the soaking water, combine with the rice and rinse the mixture at least twice, or until the water runs clear, and set aside. In a medium saucepan or soup pot, warm the ghee over medium heat. Add the black mustard seeds, cumin seeds and sauté for a couple of minutes, until the mustard seeds begin to pop. Add the turmeric, coriander, fennel, hing, and fresh ginger. Stir briefly, until aromatic. Stir the rice and dal mixture into the spices and sauté for a few moments, stirring constantly. Add the 6 cups of water, turn heat to high, and bring to a boil. When the soup comes to a boil, stir in the salt, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about forty minutes. Meanwhile, cut your vegetables into small, bite-sized pieces. About halfway through the kitchari’s cooking process, stir in the vegetables and allow the stew to return to a boil. Continue to simmer until the rice, dal, and vegetables are fully cooked. Remove from heat, cool, and serve. Note: some vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, might require more cooking time and may be added earlier, if necessary.