Cultivating Healthy Posture

Posture is one of the foundations of our overall health, and cultivating healthy posture is particularly important for our sense of wellbeing. The body’s ability to heal comes through movement, and every movement informs our posture, even as our posture informs our movement. The building blocks of healthy posture include ease and economy of motion, coordination, body-mind integration, and a balance between stability and mobility.

Postural issues can get locked into chronic holding patterns in the muscles of the body, causing ongoing muscle tension and discomfort. However, there is always a need for a certain baseline of healthy muscle tension to hold us upright and stable against the pull of gravity. This means that cultivating healthy posture is a complex process of supporting the tonic “anti-gravity” muscles even as we work to ease and release the dysfunctional chronic tension.

When we have pain, it signifies that we have dryness in the tissue, which means that the fibers have become rigid. We need to shift it back to being supple and juicy. One way is to learn to control those core and intrinsic muscles that help hold you upright. You can learn to engage the right muscles in the right order for certain movements, and to then relax any extra muscles that your body is trying to use instead of using its core. You can also use something called sensorimotor awareness, where you pay attention to certain parts of the body and how they move, and then adjust them as needed. Imagery can help you find the right alignments.

Working on healthy posture is progressive. The more you can learn to engage the right muscles and relax the extra ones who are trying to “help”, the better your posture will be. It is fundamentally a process of cultivating awareness, and can have tremendous benefits for overall health and wellbeing.

Boosting the Immune System

Manual Medicine supports deep health in the body, including boosting the immune system. Self care practices like yoga, as well as bodywork, massage, and mindfulness, are all proven to increase immune function.

Bodywork, massage, and self-care practices based on movement specifically promote increased lymph circulation. This supports the removal of pathogens and other waste from the body and helps spread white blood cells throughout the system, where they can respond quickly to immune challenges. This increases a person’s ability to fight infections.

Additionally, all of the manual medicine offerings at HaLe’ are effective for reducing cortisol, which is the hormone produced by high levels of pressure and stress. High levels of cortisol can boost blood pressure and reduce levels of natural killer cells in the immune system. Bringing those levels back down allows the immune system to function without that interference, restoring its effectiveness.

This is the time of year when immune systems can feel especially challenged by the perfect storm of lingering winter viruses and budding pollen allergies. Manual Medicine (literally, medicine you do by hand) provides powerful therapies to help boost and regulate the immune system, keeping it effective against the right kind of challenges.

Where to Begin

Begin with the body. Begin by dropping down into the body, taking a deep breath, and noticing where your body touches the floor. How are your shoulders? Your hips? Where is your breath? Is your breath more in your chest or your belly? Let it deepen. Let your body fill with your breath and notice.

Our bodies are made to move, and so movement can bring us back into a state of balance and health. Classes at HaLe’ are treatments for the body, based on movement. They reconnect us to ourselves, opening up places that are tight, stuck, or full of stress. They lengthen and strengthen and rehydrate tissues, bringing an overall sense of wellbeing.

If you can only do one thing, come to class. Begin with the goal of coming once a week, and more often if you can. Most of our classes will probably work for your body, so choose what fits your schedule and come. Talk with your instructor about how your body is feeling, so they can help adjust the class to your body instead of your body struggling to fit the class.

Support your class practice with our massage and other therapies, especially if you are in pain, very active, or have specific health challenges. A good goal is to receive body care at least once a month, and more often if there is something that needs more attention. We have a wide range of therapies available and they can do a lot to address pain and congestion, improve athletic performance, and restore balance in the body and mind.

Finally, talk to us. Tell us about what is going on with you, what challenges you are addressing, and where you feel stuck. We have an incredible collaborative team of therapists and instructors, so let us be a resource for you as you learn more about self-care and creating health.

5 Ways to Cleanse with the Changing Seasons

by the HaLe’ Team

The change of seasons can shake things up in a body and affect the balance of health. The roots of our systems, rhythms, and routines loosen. New order is about to be established, but hopefully not before a good cleansing. Here are several simple ways to support your body through the seasonal shift:

Massage & Bodywork: The changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature affect the lymphatic system and its ability to clear out the body. This especially true for people with damaged lymphatic systems, but a lot of people will begin to feel bloated and icky, and generally not great. The lymphatic support of massage helps the body complete its cleansing process and move body fluids. Any kind of massage will help with this, though if deep, vigorous massage doesn’t sound good to you, consider trying a gentler technique like lymphatic massage or relaxation massage.     -Adie Grey MacKenzie, LMT

Cupping Therapy: These cups use negative pressure (suction) to literally create space in the body. This allows the old stagnated blood to be broken up and moved out. The body’s response is to heal and restore the area that received the cupping, which brings a sense of lighter, cleaner space in the body, a free flow of energy, and room for new possibilities. -Erin Law, LMT

Yoga: The onset of Fall is a powerful time to use our yoga practice as a means to re-balance the body. Big exhales, deep twists, and gentle forward folds help to prepare us for the onset of brisk weather. Winter is soon approaching. We want to shake out our bodies and flush away the unnecessary holding so that we can comfortably turn inward and nestle into ourselves during the darker months of Winter.     -Jane House, RYT

Ayurveda: Support other cleansing practices with tongue scraping. Do it every morning, back to front. Cleanses build up ama, or toxins, which are described as a sticky waste. Scraping these from the tongue keeps the toxins from being redirected back into the body, and reduces bad breath. Also make sure to take extra time to rest, and try to plan your cleanse during a time when you can take it easy.     -Summer Leniger, Ayurveda Wellness Counselor

Mental Cleansing Meditation: Visualize the mind space as rooms in your house. With eyes closed and body upright, awake, and alert, travel from room to room repeating these cleansing phrases:

  • Entry hall / front door: “Breathing in, I know I am breathing in. Breathing out, I know I am breathing out.”
  • Great room / main living area: “Being here, Being now.”
  • Kitchen: “Letting go of worry, Letting be this moment.”
  • Bedroom: “Calming the mind, Releasing the tension.”
  • Bathroom: “I can have peace any moment,I have peace in this moment.”
  • Attic / crawl space / basement: “Nowhere to go, No one to be, Just being.”      -Elmo Shade, Mindfulness Coach

5 Things You Should Always Do at Your Desk

from the HaLe’ Team

Sitting at a desk is hard on the body. Here are several ways to easily reduce the knots and tension:

1. Start with Right Angles. Adjust your workspace so that your feet, hips, and arms are at right angles to the floor. Your screen should be directly in front of your eyes so that your neck remains neutral, neither craned up or hunched down. Your keyboard should be in easy reach with your arms parallel to the floor. No need to strain to keep a straight back; use a pillow to bring the chair back closer to you. You can also use a small stool to bring the floor up to your feet and stacks of books to adjust the height of the computer and keyboard.

2. Engage the Core. A lot of pain that comes from sitting is caused by a weak core, since sitting allows the belly to soften. Try a sneaky seated crunch: Put both hands on your thighs, then try to curl your chest down toward your legs while resisting the movement with the arms. Hold this for 10 seconds and then release. This can especially help with low back pain and sometimes neck pain as well.

3. Rest the Eyes. Cup your palms over your eyes, with the heels of your hands resting on the cheekbones. It is hard on our eyes to stay at one focal distance for an extended period of time, like staring at a computer screen, and palming the eyes every so often helps to change that distance. The eyes affect our entire nervous system, and so releasing eye strain helps our entire body relax.

4. Stretch the Pecs. Use a door frame or clasp your hands behind your back to stretch your pecs every time you get up. The pecs are the root of a lot of upper back and shoulder tension, and even some neck tension. The shoulders roll forward and inward when sitting at a computer, which tightens the pecs and stretches the upper back beyond what it can support for prolonged periods of time. Stretching the pecs regularly during your workday helps offset this process.

5. Stand Up Every 30 min. Stand up and maybe walk around a little every 30 minutes, and it will do wonders for how you feel at the end of your workday. Our bodies are designed to be hunter gatherers and stay active throughout the day, so getting out of that sitting and concentrating position really makes a difference. Just standing up for a moment helps, but try to walk a little, take three deep belly breaths where you blow all the air out each time, twist your trunk back forth, and do some stretches like 8 Ways to Do Yoga at Your Desk.

 

These tips courtesy of HaLe’ Body Care Specialists Erin Law, Adie MacKenzie, Will Ravenel, and Katherine Correa.

When to Get Cupping Therapy

by Chelsea Henry

Cupping Therapy improves muscle performance and moves fluids by using negative pressure (suction) to lift tissue. It is a powerful healing tool that can be customized and utilized effectively for a wide range of body issues.

Muscle Tension: The pull of the cups on contracted muscle tissue helps it to release and relax. This is especially effective when done as a complement to massage.

Chronic Muscle Pain: The connective tissue that wraps around muscles is called fascia, and it can adhere to the muscle in a way that prevents the muscle from fully releasing, causing chronic or recurring pain. Cupping can help release the fascia (also called myofascial release), especially when the cups are moved along the tissue.

Scar Tissue: Cupping can help break up scar tissue adhesions, allowing better flow of blood and lymph and freeing bound muscular tissue for improved range of motion and performance.

Swelling: Using cups around bruised or swollen tissue can help draw excess fluids away and stimulate healing.

Joint Pain: Cupping around an achy joint (knee, shoulder, etc.) can help draw blood and nutrient flow to the problem area to speed healing, as well as release myofascial issues and muscle tension that may be contributing to the discomfort.

Cold/Flu or Deep Cough: Cups applied to the back over the lungs can help break up lung congestion and stimulate healthy respiratory function. Facial cupping can also help relieve sinus pressure.

Digestive Issues: Abdominal cupping can help relieve digestive distress and stimulate healthy bowel function.

TMJ and Facial Dysfunction: Specially designed smaller cups will not leave marks on the face and can be used to address problems in the jaw and other facial issues, stimulating healing and restoring function.

Cellulite: The distinctive appearance of cellulite is caused by an underlying grid-like structure of the skin, which spreads to allow fat tissue to bulge through. Cupping with silicone cups can help reset this grid-like structure, closing gaps and smoothing the appearance of the cellulite.

Women’s Health: Regular abdominal cupping can decrease menstrual discomfort and address fibroids. It also helps draw back together the abdominal separation caused by pregnancy, and can help with scar tissue from breast reconstruction/augmentation.

Cupping Therapy Plays Well with Others

by Chelsea Henry

Cupping therapy is an important part of our integrative health practice because it supports the process of many of our treatments. I talked with several of our talented therapists about how it complements the work that they do and how they use it. This is what they said:

Erin Law, Therapeutic Sports Massage:

Cupping therapy helps to jump start myofascial release. The negative pressure of the suction combined with movement gives a different sensation than other myofascial techniques and helps the muscle reset itself to where it needs to be because the fascia has released. It is a great complement to other techniques and can sometimes create shifts that provide instant relief and allow chronic problems to just fade away.

Rocio Hernandez, Ashiatsu Massage:

Using cupping therapy after an Ashiatsu treatment really helps to bring the blood flow to the area, especially any area that is feeling stagnant, like the back or arm. The suction also helps to release the muscle when it is contracting, making for a faster release and bringing blood flow more quickly to the area. Afterward, people tend to feel either really energized or like they just ran a marathon.

Katherine Casey, Acupuncture:

Cupping facilitates better movement of blood and qi in an acupuncture treatment because of the openness of the tissue. The cups create negative pressure, as compared with massage, which uses positive pressure. This negative pressure opens up muscle and tissue, which works in concert with acupuncture needles to move qi.

Adie Grey MacKenzie, Lymphatic Massage:

Cupping can be very effective in helping to break up scar tissue that is impeding lymph flow, but it is not usually indicated for treating lymphadema or other lymphatic issues directly because it can be too aggressive for the lymph system. However, cupping works through the use of negative pressure, and a machine that uses very gentle negative pressure has recently been shown to be a successful lymphadema treatment. This is a growing edge conversation in the lymphatic massage community right now as we learn more about how to use cups and other negative pressure tools gently enough to support the lymphatic system.

Lymphatic Massage Speeds Recovery from Surgery

from Adie Grey MacKenzie

The lymph system is both a producer of materials that help us heal and a septic system, and so supporting its function through lymphatic massage can speed our recovery from surgery. Lymphatic massage assists the body in moving inflammatory components back out of the system and it gooses our immune system function to help the healing process.

There is a cascade of events that allows us to heal. Part of that process is the inflammatory response, which is necessary for healing to happen when we disrupt the body through surgery. Inflammation also means there will be swelling localized to the surgical area, which slows the lymph system’s ability to do its job of moving wastes out and healthy components in. After surgery, it is also the lymph system that helps the body process all the materials that need to be moved out, including excess fluids given during surgery.

Lymphatic massage assists the function of the lymph system through all these processes. It also stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, which is especially good in healing times because it allows our bodies to really rest in order to heal efficiently and effectively. This also has an analgesic effect because the parasympathetic nervous system calms our perception of pain. There is a whole interplay of physiological functions that lymphatic work supports, helping to heal from surgery, reduce post surgical pain and swelling, and speed return to function. It also helps avoid infection because it helps keep the immune system more fully functional.

Receiving lymphatic massage feels gentle and rhythmic, helping us to breathe more deeply and rest more fully, and is safer for tissues that are still healing after surgery. Even clients who have always thought they need deep and vigorous massage are surprised at how effective and soothing lymphatic massage is, with its relatively light touch. It is both satisfying and plenty deep enough to do profound work in supporting the healing process.

The Magic Muscle: the Psoas

from Kaaren Engel

The psoas (pronounced so-az) is the one muscle that attaches the upper body to the lower body. It allows locomotion by allowing you to lift your legs to actually walk. It is the filet mignon of the body, the tenderloin, and is actually very delicate. It needs to be treated with sensitivity, so that it becomes juicy and full and soft. When it is juicy, you walk like a dancer, with legs that just swing from your body.

It is also the emotional core of the body, holding massive amounts of emotional information. It is where we hold birth and childhood trauma, or any other trauma, because it is directly a part of our flight or fight response. This makes sense because you are either running or curling into a ball, which are both primarily psoas reactions. When you’ve been traumatized and just want to curl up, that is the psoas acting as a protector, and when you release that, you can stand up straight, face the world, and approach it with ease.  It can also hold good stuff if you create that. A relaxed and juicy psoas leads to full body orgasms that flow through your whole body.

One of the best things you can do for your psoas is Constructive Rest Pose, where you lie on your back with your knees bent and feet parallel to each other at the width of your hip sockets, about 12-16″ away from your buttocks. You can also put your feet up on a chair. This pose allows the psoas to drop and lengthen. A fetal curl also allows it to soften and relax. These simple relaxations are so important. They not only change the body physically, but you can feel yourself moving more deeply into the floor. Your sympathetic nervous system gets a break and the body gets soft, bringing us a treasure trove for the body, mind, and spirit.

You can also work with balls to soften and hydrate the feet, standing up and pressing and releasing the foot onto a ball. This hydrates the tissues all the way up to the psoas, which is why we do a lot of it in class.

The psoas is fascinating because everything lands there, all your emotional issues, everything, and it works best when it is soft and relaxed. We can play with it, approaching it with a childlike curiosity of how things move. And when the psoas is juicy, we will all walk like dancers, with an easy flow.

Health Tips for Jet Lag and Travel

The keys to taking care of your body while traveling are hydration, combating insomnia, and body comfort. We’ve asked some of our expert team how to best support the body through travel. Here is what they said:

Acupuncture AppleKatherine Casey, Acupuncturist: These three acupressure points will help support your body through jet lag and travel weariness:

Stomach 36: Stretch legs out in front of you and place a pillow under your knees. Place the fingers of your right hand directly under the left kneecap. Just under the little finger, about a thumb’s distance from the shin bone you will find a little hollow place. That is S 36. Apply gentle even pressure for about a couple minutes and repeat on the other side.

Xin Bao 6: Find the wrist crease on the palm side of the left hand. Measure 2 thumb widths from the crease. The point is located between the tendons. Apply gentle pressure with the tip of the thumb for a minute or so. Repeat on the other side.

Ren 6: Lie comfortably on your back. Place the first 3 fingers of your left hand directly below your navel. With your right hand, place your index finger directly below your navel right next to your 3rd finger. Massage this point for a couple of minutes.

 

Woman On Yoga BolsterJane House, Yoga Teacher:  When you come back from a trip, remember that there are 2 parts to a really good yoga practice: the physical, and what I call telling the truth. Physically, prioritize getting sleep, listen to your body, and allow a couple of days on either side of the trip to settle back in and recalibrate before you go back to your usual schedule.

A yoga posture that is especially helpful is a gentle forward fold, where you stand with your sitting bones on the wall, walk your feet forward 12-18 inches from the wall, and then bend forward. This has elements of child’s pose as you lay along your thighs, allowing you to breathe into your back a bit. Also helpful are gentle twists, inversions, downward dog, and cat-cow for spinal releasing.

For the second part, Telling the Truth, find a person that can hear you and is present for you where you are. Have a conversation about your trip and anything that shifted, or realizations, or experiences. Trips can often rearrange us a little and it is very grounding to connect with your people when you come back.

 

Various spices and herbsLiz Workman Mead, Ayurvedic & Nutritional Counselor:

Take Ashwaganda, which is a rejuvenate and helps with the way travel throws off the body’s biochemistry. Take it the night before and then while traveling, especially to help sleep. (available at HaLe’)

Take Triphala, which helps fix constipation, assists with detoxification, and regulates the bowels. (available at HaLe’)

Drink lots of water, and in summer, put things in the water like cucumber or mint to help cool your body.

Do dry massage: take a dry washcloth before you get in the bath and start at your ankles, brushing up toward the heart to get circulation going. This is especially good for when you’ve been sitting a long time.

 

zen stones jy wooden banch on the beach near sea. OutdoorJanice Cathey, Bodyworker: Biochemical processes don’t move as fast as we can travel, so the body needs support in catching up.

Help reset your sleep cycle with exposure to natural sun for at least 20 min. Using a natural sleep aid such as melatonin can also help.

Balance the hips and release the neck and shoulders because those can get compacted during travel.

We need to stay more hydrated than usual. Coconut water and bottled spring water are especially good. 

Diet-wise, eat bananas and maybe some nuts. Avoid fatty foods, spicy foods, dairy, and caffeine.

Take an epsom salt bath with a little lavender or something in it that rejuvenates to help with travel weariness. 

Page 1 of 212