What Is CBD Oil?

CBD is cannabidiol, which is one of the many compounds that come from the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, it has no psychotropic effects and does NOT make you feel high. It is an effective treatment for a wide variety of health concerns, and is legal in all 50 states when sourced from hemp and has no THC content.

How it works: the human body naturally produces cannabinoids internally, and has two kinds of receptors for them: CB1 receptors, which are mostly in the brain, and CB2 receptors, which are most common in the immune system and affect inflammation and pain. CBD oil does not affect either of these receptors directly, but influences the body to use more of its own cannabinoids.

What it helps: At HaLé, the two most popular uses for CBD oil are for pain and sleep. CBD oil provides natural pain relief and helps reduce inflammation for both chronic pain and acute pain symptoms. It also helps regulate sleep by calming the nervous system, and is helpful both for ongoing sleep issues and for the dysregulation that comes from travel.

CBD oil can also help reduce anxiety behaviors that come from PTSD, anxiety disorders, and OCD, and it does so with very few side effects, unlike many of the medications often used to treat these conditions.

Side effects: CBD is widely tolerated by adults across a wide dose range. There are no side effects on the central nervous system, vital signs, or mood, among those who use it slightly or heavily. The most common side effect is tiredness.

CBD at HaLé: We are pleased to carry high quality CBD products from companies we trust. We offer some tinctures that go under the tongue for bedtime or daily use, a transdermal patch that lasts up to 12 hours, and some topical products that can be applied directly to where it hurts. A growing number of our clients have discovered that CBD is an effective supplement for them, and HaLé has come to believe strongly in the power of this plant medicine.

Core Awareness 101: Intro the the Psoas

The psoas (so-az) muscle is the deepest muscle in the body, connecting the spine to the leg and stretching from solar plexus to upper thigh. It is a crucial element of core strength. However, it is not a muscle that does best when strengthened, stretched, or massaged. Instead, to best work toward core health and psoas health, we need to approach it from an understanding of how it relates to the whole body, not just its mechanical function.

The first thing to understand about the psoas is that it is about motion. It is the only muscle that connects the trunk of the body to the legs, and it is what allows you to lift your leg with each step. It is a suspension bridge to the spine, stabilizing it the same way ropes stabilize a tent. It also supports organ health, helping to hold the organs in place and massaging them as the body moves. This improves fluid and nutrient flow, which helps keep them functioning well.

When the psoas has dysfunction, it is usually due to exhaustion. Many factors can contribute to this, including structural imbalances, injuries, and restrictive clothing, shoes, and chairs that keep us from moving naturally most of the time. Because the psoas is about providing stability while in motion, it will work harder to compensate for a lack of stability, and so grow thick and short. This in turn pulls the pelvis out of alignment and transfers stress to the knees and low back. It also becomes less effective at supporting organ health.

The psoas is also tied directly into the flight or fight response, as it is the muscle that helps curl us into a protective ball or allows us to run and jump our way out of danger. A chronically exhausted psoas, then, sends a constant signal of stress and danger to the body. This has emotional and physical consequences and can exhaust the adrenals and deplete the immune system.

Working with the psoas to restore health and vitality to the whole system means bringing awareness and ease to the core. Moving from a tight, thick psoas to a juicy, supple one can relieve a wide range of symptoms, including water retention, sleep issues, foot rotations, and deep-seated fears. It may take practice to build awareness of the psoas, but when it becomes juicy, we are able to move with more ease and vitality.

What is HaLe’ Yoga?

HaLe’ Yoga is therapeutic and mindfulness-based, which means it works to create awareness even as it supports the health and healing of the body. There is a unique connection between the body and mind, and the practice of HaLe’ Yoga is designed to use this connection to build self-awareness and increase the clarity and accuracy of how you know yourself.

We all have things that come up for us in our bodies and minds. Sometimes they are constant symptoms, and sometimes they show up every so often. The body is always talking to us through pain, pleasure, and other sensations. We can learn to understand this language.

The practice of yoga is a great way to learn to speak with our own bodies. We can sit and breathe and listen, allowing information to come from the body up instead of from the head down. We can practice the movement of yoga to connect the body and the mind, to bring us a more peaceful, balanced feeling.

HaLe’ Yoga integrates movement, breath, and awareness to connect you to yourself and cultivate health. Yoga can be your greatest self-care guide as you create health and wellness from the inside out.

What is Ayurvedic & Nutritional Counseling?

Ayurveda is an ancient system of health that begins with an in depth study of your own constitution. To begin, an Ayurvedic practitioner will spend a couple of hours asking a lot of questions, including what vitamins you take, what you eat, childhood illnesses and accidents, your sleep, and your digestion. They really take the time to get clear on how your body works and responds to the world.

This kind of session both identifies your constitution, and gives you the tools to feel secure about what you need to be doing. Ayurveda focuses on one issue at a time, and so the consult will include a plan to address your chief complaint. Because everyone digests things differently, two people with the same complaint but different constitutions will have very different treatments. There is no one pill that fits all.

There are so many factors to consider that it seems very complex, and yet once you know your constitution, it makes things so much easier. It creates a sense of awareness, like falling awake. The different constitutions (doshas) have different innate responses to life and food, and how they respond to imbalance is also very different. Knowing what is normal and what is a sign of imbalance in your constitution helps you know when your body needs support.

What is Integrative Medicine?

HaLe’ offers integrative health care based on a personal relationship. We want to talk with you, hear more about what is going on with your whole person, and address whatever you think needs help or optimization. We build on your strengths to help increase function, reduce stress, manage pain, and improve athletic performance.

Integrative medicine is a form of health care that focuses on the whole person. It uses evidence-based practices, which means your treatments have been proven to help. Taking a “yes, and” approach, all appropriate therapies and disciplines are utilized in order to achieve optimal health and healing.

At HaLe’, our template treatment plan is to begin a self-care practice with our classes, and to support that practice through individualized care to address deeper or acute issues. Our instructors are experts in customizing and modifying classes in order to meet the needs of both new beginner students and experienced students looking to deepen their practice. Our therapists offer manual medicine in the form of  bodywork, massage, mindfulness, and coaching sessions to really address the specific needs of each client.

52% of manual medicine is utilized for medical treatment

19% of manual medicine is for pain relief & pain management

72% of self-care classes are utilized for stress relief

86% of students in self-care classes report high mental clarity

Integrative Medicine is non-invasive with few side effects and little evidence of harm. It is supported by the majority of PCPs and most clients notice their health conditions change for the better, along with improvements in overall health, better habits, improved mood, and body awareness.

What is Fascia?

Fascia is connective tissue made primarily of collagen that connects every part of the body, and often serves as a storage medium for fat and water, and as a passageway for lymph, nerve, and blood vessels. It also surrounds organs, glands, and individual muscles, and suspends the organs within their cavities. It is a complex system that literally connects every part of the body with every other part and can have a profound effect on health.

The full roll of fascia in the body and its relation to health is just now being explored because imaging technology has only recently been able to show us how the living fascia looks and acts. Problems with the fascia happen when it loses its stiffness, becomes too stiff, or isn’t otherwise able to move the way it needs to move. When it is too loose it can lead to organ prolapse, and when it is too tight, it can cause organ dysfunction and muscle pain. Fascia is also probably a crucial part of our ability to sense where our bodies are in space, to sense pain, and to feel internal sensations.

Lengthening and hydrating are the key ways to support the health of our fascia systems. Fascia does not stretch, and so lengthening happens through certain kinds of slow, steady applied pressure. Hydrating is not a matter of drinking liquids, but instead of activating and moving the water and other fluids already stored in the fascia.

At HaLe’, we offer both therapies and classes to support the health of the fascia. Our classes are great generalized treatments, especially our MELT Method and Girls with Balls classes, and so make a wonderful foundation for a strong self-care practice. For more acute or chronic conditions, we offer bodywork and massage to address the fascia in ways only a trained therapist can provide. Our myofascial release and Rolf Therapy offerings work specifically with the fascia to reduce pain and muscular dysfunction, and our Ashiatsu massage therapists use slow, applied foot pressure to very precisely and effectively lengthen and hydrate fascia.

What is Therapeutic Yoga?

by Chelsea Henry

Therapeutic Yoga uses yoga as a specific, individualized treatment that draws on a deep expertise and understanding of the body. All yoga can have therapeutic benefits, bringing healing and balance to the body, mind, and spirit. Therapeutic Yoga, however, is designed specifically around encouraging these therapeutic benefits and comes from a place of expert anatomical and physiological training.

One great benefit of Therapeutic Yoga is that it opens up yoga practice to a much larger population than would otherwise try yoga. An important goal of classes is that students leave feeling better than when they came in, and that they feel successful at having done yoga, regardless of the injury, disease, or illness they might be working with.

A Therapeutic Yoga class meets the students where they are, so that they are not struggling and can really find inner rest. It is not just a gentle approach, but also very precisely meets their body with support at the exact right angle for their needs, using blankets and other props as well as hands-on adjustments.

As an example, in our Neck and Back Care Yoga class, blanket support and other adjustments are used to really specialize and create the right angle to access the spine specifically. Every pose begins with pranayama breathing practice, and then the sequences begin by opening up the tailbone, and then the sacrum area, lumbar spine, and ribcage. People often come in with neck and shoulder issues and find that just the breathing itself begins to open up their range of motion, changing the neck by opening the spine, and then they feel an improvement in their neck and shoulders.

Therapeutic Yoga is a powerful healing method, accessible to every body. Students don’t have to be advanced practitioners, or even flexible. This is a reasonable self-care tool that meets students exactly where they are, at the intersection of their mind and their body. It is like finding a sliding door, rather than pushing or pulling the door to get in, and it accesses the amazing healing power of our bodies.

Ryoko Suzuki contributed to this article.

Integrative Medicine & the Growing Edge of Health Care

Integrative medicine is an approach to care that puts the patient at the center and addresses the full range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences that affect a person’s health. Employing a personalized strategy that considers the patient’s unique conditions, needs and circumstances, it uses the most appropriate interventions from an array of scientific disciplines to heal illness and disease and help people regain and maintain optimum health.   Duke Integrative Medicine

Integrative medicine is patient-centered health care that takes the whole person into account. It is not alternative care, which is used in place of western medicine, and it is not complementary care, which is used to supplement western medicine. Instead, Integrative Medicine begins with the health of the patient and partners with them to address all the causes of an illness, not just the treatment of symptoms. There is a complex interplay between the biological, behavioral, psychosocial, and environmental influences on health, and so it is necessary to engage with the full range of these influences.

In order to take this full spectrum approach to health, Integrative Medicine uses all available healing sciences to best treat the patient’s unique circumstances. Through a willingness to use the healing modalities that will be the most effective and least invasive options, and to combine these treatments into personalized care, Integrative Medicine

neither rejects conventional medicine nor uncritically embraces alternative therapies; rather, integrative medicine can be described as a practice that “cherry picks” the best and scientifically supported therapies of both systems. The ultimate goal: to get the patient better, through the use of safe, effective, less-invasive interventions whenever possible.   UCLA, Explore Integrative Medicine

Integrative Medicine also focuses on prevention and the development of effective self-care for patients. According to the CDC, 70% of all deaths are due to chronic disease, and the cost of chronic care accounts for 75% of all medical expenses. Yet we spend very little on prevention and health promotion, which has been proven to dramatically reduce the burden of chronic disease. Our conventional medical system has a bias toward high-tech and invasive crisis intervention, which contributes to the dysfunction in our health care system. Integrative Medicine is a growing solution to these issues as it invests in the whole body health of patients and partners with them on their healing journey in order to empower their physical, mental, and spiritual health.

HaLe’ is Integrative Health Care. We use techniques with proven effectiveness to treat each patient under their own unique circumstances, and we partner with and empower the health of all our clients. Our offerings are rich with opportunities and support for continued health and healing.

 

The Magic Muscle: the Psoas

from Kaaren Engel

The psoas (pronounced so-az) is the one muscle that attaches the upper body to the lower body. It allows locomotion by allowing you to lift your legs to actually walk. It is the filet mignon of the body, the tenderloin, and is actually very delicate. It needs to be treated with sensitivity, so that it becomes juicy and full and soft. When it is juicy, you walk like a dancer, with legs that just swing from your body.

It is also the emotional core of the body, holding massive amounts of emotional information. It is where we hold birth and childhood trauma, or any other trauma, because it is directly a part of our flight or fight response. This makes sense because you are either running or curling into a ball, which are both primarily psoas reactions. When you’ve been traumatized and just want to curl up, that is the psoas acting as a protector, and when you release that, you can stand up straight, face the world, and approach it with ease.  It can also hold good stuff if you create that. A relaxed and juicy psoas leads to full body orgasms that flow through your whole body.

One of the best things you can do for your psoas is Constructive Rest Pose, where you lie on your back with your knees bent and feet parallel to each other at the width of your hip sockets, about 12-16″ away from your buttocks. You can also put your feet up on a chair. This pose allows the psoas to drop and lengthen. A fetal curl also allows it to soften and relax. These simple relaxations are so important. They not only change the body physically, but you can feel yourself moving more deeply into the floor. Your sympathetic nervous system gets a break and the body gets soft, bringing us a treasure trove for the body, mind, and spirit.

You can also work with balls to soften and hydrate the feet, standing up and pressing and releasing the foot onto a ball. This hydrates the tissues all the way up to the psoas, which is why we do a lot of it in class.

The psoas is fascinating because everything lands there, all your emotional issues, everything, and it works best when it is soft and relaxed. We can play with it, approaching it with a childlike curiosity of how things move. And when the psoas is juicy, we will all walk like dancers, with an easy flow.

Now about those needles…

by Katherine Casey, LAc

If you have never had any experience with acupuncture before, you are probably concerned about the needles. This is understandable, because the only needles we are familiar with are hypodermic needles, which are hollow-bodied, and designed to either take something out of us (blood), or put something in us (medication). Neither experience is ever very pleasant!

Acupuncture needles are completely different from hypodermic needles. They are very thin, solid body (meaning, they aren’t hollow like hypodermic needles are), and they serve the purpose of delivering a message. They direct qi (that animating force that keeps us alive, pronounced “chi”) to do something, like “go over here and nourish the lungs because this body has a bad cold.”

Another concern people often have about acupuncture needles is whether or not they are reused. And the answer to this is an unequivocal and emphatic NO. Acupuncture needles arrive from the supplier in sterile packaging, and they are single use only, just like hypodermic needles. They are disposed of in a sharps container just like the ones found in doctors’ offices and hospitals. Acupuncture needles are never, ever reused.

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