ashiatsu nashville

What is Ashiatsu?

Have you ever seen photographs or video footage of a therapist walking on a client’s back, using overhead bars and straps as support?

That is Ashiatsu, a powerful and effective form of massage therapy that is one of our offerings here at Ha.Le’ Mind and Body. In Japanese, the root word “Ashi” means foot and “Atsu” means pressure.

Controlled foot pressure uses physics of both bodies – therapist and client – for maximum benefit. With feet, the therapist activates acupressure points and spreads tissue fibers, distributing more body weight and pressure than what is available during traditional massage therapy using fingers, hands and arms.

With the feet, Ashiatsu therapists push, pull and pump tissue to relieve symptoms of chronic soft tissue damage. Ashiatsu is very effective at treating scar tissue and is the most profound way to receive myofascial release.  The support bars and straps allow therapists to control the weight and pressure – Ashiatsu feels like a deep massage (which it is) more than it feels like someone is walking on your back.

Barefoot massage techniques have deep historical roots throughout Asia and date back at least 3,000 years. In India, oils on bare skin and one balancing rope characterize Chavutti Thermal. Elsewhere throughout the Pacific Rim, Buddhist monks would provide the healing art of barefoot massage, through clothing, to pilgrims who made financial offerings of support and devotion.

In the West, Ashiatsu was introduced by Ruthie Harding, who saw a group of women using their feet to massage a row of men on cots in the Philippines in 1967. The women all used one long rod suspended from the ceiling for support. During a trip to India, she saw a man stabilizing himself with two knotted cloths hanging from a tree while using his feet to massage a man on a mat.

I trained at Ruthie Harding’s facility in Colorado. Here in Nashville Ashiatsu massage is one of our specialties. The method creates a strong bond between therapist and client. Such a bond increases a client’s comfort level, making the massage more effective. We use a method of sinking into muscle fibers as breath allows, and the pace and knowledge of our therapist make our sessions therapeutic, profound, and beneficial.

One size does not fit all when it comes to body work, but for many of our clients in Nashville Ashiatsu is the perfect fit.

If you’d like to experience Ashiatsu, give us a call at 615-415-0242.

What is Ear Acupuncture?

The eyes may be a window to the soul but the ears are a gateway to the whole human organism.

Ear acupuncture involves stimulating five points on the ear to help lessen pain and illness, much like foot reflexology. The ears, like the feet, contain groups of “pluripotent cells” that hold information from the whole organism, allowing local stimulation to target another area of the body.

Stimulation of ear points has a rich, ancient history across many cultures, but its efficacy as a complementary medicine began an ascent in the mid-1950s. Dr. Paul Nogier, a French physician, is considered the father of modern “auricolotherapy,” as the practice is known.

He observed repeated, predictable somatotopic connections between ear points and specific body regions. Dr. Nogier also was the first to recognize ‘the man in the ear,’ or homunculus – anatomical correlations of an upside-down fetus in the human ear to points on the body.

Ear acupuncture is helpful in treatment of stress, behavioral health, including addictions, mental health, and disaster and emotional trauma, post traumatic stress disorders, acute and chronic pain, anxiety-related disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, smoke cessation, alcohol withdrawal and substance abuse.

After training as an Acu Detox specialist (ADS) at Yale University in 2012 I started providing weekly sliding scale treatments for those within my community as a stress reduction service. The use of five specific points stimulated by disposable sterilized needles helps calm the nervous system, quiets the mind, and brings a more balanced state of being.

Ear acupuncture practitioners use different tools to stimulate ear points and prompt a relaxation response, from finger tools to acupressure, laser and electricity, magnetic balls and seeds, and tiny acupuncture needles.

The goal remains the same: use five points in each ear for each person. In this way, the therapy creates a collective healing experience by tapping into points connected to body systems:

  • Sympathetic point: relaxes the entire body, stimulates the vagus nerve, promotes a shift from sympathetic mode to parasympathetic mode
  • Shen Men (Spirit Gate): relaxes the mind, calms the spirit, reduces anxiety
  • Kidney: promotes optimal kidney function, transforms the effects of excess fear
  • Liver: promotes optimal liver function, transforms the effects of excess anger and frustration
  • Lung: promotes optimal lung function, transforms the effects of excess grief and loss

Many clients immediately report better sleep, fewer headaches, less physical pain, and greater emotional wellbeing. I hope to see you soon!

 

What is Watsu

What is Watsu?

The word “Watsu” is a combination of water and shiatsu.

Watsu therapy takes place in warm water. Through Watsu, I am able to rotate, flex and move my client’s muscles in ways not possible on a massage table. When a client is tense or rigid, I assist in positioning the body to effect complete relaxation.

The result is a fuller, more therapeutic massage. Water allows for freedom of the spinal vertebrae, mild rotation of joints and maximum elongation of muscles.

The client is supported by the warm water, held and moved rhythmically by the therapist, who also incorporates individualized breathing techniques. This non-impact series of postures helps clients break free from old posture and movement patterns, which often contribute to persistent, if not chronic, pain.

Water therapy helps reduce emotional stress, aids in flexibility and alleviates aches and pains. Below are comments from residents of a continuing care retirement community who received Watsu therapy twice a month for 18 months as part of a study:

  • “It is wonderfully relaxing and has helped my back.”
  • “I experienced some chronic leg pain before I began receiving Watsu. It has almost disappeared.”
  • “I sleep better. I have a sense of well-being. My blood pressure is so much lower that my medication has been cut in half.”
  • “It is the most relaxing experience I’ve ever had.”

Based on restorative principles of stress reduction, release of physical tension and acupressure, Watsu can benefit clients of all types. This modality is especially suited to people with histories of physical ailments that include arthritis, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, cancer, spinal fusion, Parkinson’s disease and hip/knee replacement or restoration.

The movements are gentle and fluid and don’t require limbering up or warming up before a session. As a water therapy, Watsu alleviates joint pressure and creates a profound sense of well-being.

I’ve been practicing Watsu therapy in Nashville at the Greenhills Health Center off Woodmont Boulevard for several years. Not only does the GHHC have the warmest salt pool in Nashville, the center provides a supportive atmosphere for rehabilitation.

I’ve adapted Watsu for individuals with a range of circumstances: children with special needs; children with learning differences; teenagers; and clients with PTSD’s, chronic pain, or hip and knee replacements. I also use Watsu with people who have had sexual trauma, stroke and those who are pre-surgery, post-surgery, or pregnant.

Those of us who explore Watsu’s potential for healing find lasting benefits, powerful experiences, and, most of all, a deep connection to just being alive.

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