8 Ways to be More Mindful at Work

There are many ways to incorporate mindfulness throughout your work day, and you only need a few minutes at a time. Here are 8 ideas to get you started:

1. Take a moment when you wake up: Take 2 minutes to just notice your breath when you first wake up. We release the most stress hormones right after waking up, as our thoughts about our day provoke fight-or-flight responses.

2. Take 10 min in the car or at your desk: Spend the first 5-10 min of your work day just paying attention to your breath. When you find your mind distracted, release the distraction and return attention to your breath. Many things will compete for your attention throughout the work day; for these few minutes, your attention is entirely your own.

3. Pause between meetings: Take a minute or two to practice mindfulness at the beginning of each meeting to boost your focus and effectiveness.

4. Single-task: When we multi-task, our brain switches rapidly from one task to another, often losing information each time. Try to group similar tasks together and do one task at a time as much as possible.

5. Connect with your senses: Up to 47% of our day is spent on autopilot, thinking about something other than what we are doing. Come back to your senses, sight, sound, smell, etc. in order to stay more present and aware.

6. Use reminders: Every time your phone rings or dings, take a mindful breath. Or set an alarm to go off every hour to cue a minute of mindfulness. Place a small sign or note in your workspace to remind you.

7. Practice gratitude: Humans have a negativity bias, where we naturally focus on problems. Deliberately find things that are going well in order to boost creativity, health, work relationships, and the quality of your work.

8. Accept what you can’t change: Being mindful means accepting the present moment as it is, and yourself as you are now. Once you accept what is happening, you can move forward with next steps and learning from any mistakes.

Yes, HSAs and FSAs cover massage and acupuncture

Health Savings Accounts (HSA) and Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA) can be used to pay for massage and acupuncture treatments, as long as your physician recommends it with a written prescription. At HaLe’, we deeply believe in the effectiveness of our treatments, and are very excited to see bodywork, massage, and acupuncture covered as the health care it is.

To get a written prescription from your medical provider, you will need to talk with them about receiving treatment for a specific medical ailment. Some examples of qualifying issues are: stress, back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, arthritis, diabetes, hypertension, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain.  Explain to them that you have an HSA or FSA that you would like to use to pay for bodywork, massage, or acupuncture to address your ailment. If you are already receiving these kinds of treatments, tell your doctor about how much they are helping you and how effective you find them.

To support this conversation, HaLe’ is happy write a letter to bring with you, detailing our suggested treatment plan for that ailment. Your doctor may choose to write the prescription to match that plan or may make adjustments based on their expertise. Either way, the prescription needs to include these 3 pieces of information:

  • Medical necessity: what condition you are treating
  • Frequency: how many sessions per month
  • Duration: how many months

Once you have your prescription, let us know what it says and then file it away with your records in case you are ever asked to back up your expense. You can pay for your sessions at HaLe’ directly with the card or check associated with your health spending account, if you have them. Please note that gratuity is not considered part of the cost and so does not qualify as a qualifying expense. Also, for some people, our classes might also be effective treatments for their ailments, and prescriptions for those could also be appropriate.

At HaLe’, we want you to feel good about what you are doing for your health. These HSA and FSA payment options make our treatments more accessible, which means we can be effective health care for more people, so you can get better and feel good!

What is Ayurvedic & Nutritional Counseling?

Ayurveda is an ancient system of health that begins with an in depth study of your own constitution. To begin, an Ayurvedic practitioner will spend a couple of hours asking a lot of questions, including what vitamins you take, what you eat, childhood illnesses and accidents, your sleep, and your digestion. They really take the time to get clear on how your body works and responds to the world.

This kind of session both identifies your constitution, and gives you the tools to feel secure about what you need to be doing. Ayurveda focuses on one issue at a time, and so the consult will include a plan to address your chief complaint. Because everyone digests things differently, two people with the same complaint but different constitutions will have very different treatments. There is no one pill that fits all.

There are so many factors to consider that it seems very complex, and yet once you know your constitution, it makes things so much easier. It creates a sense of awareness, like falling awake. The different constitutions (doshas) have different innate responses to life and food, and how they respond to imbalance is also very different. Knowing what is normal and what is a sign of imbalance in your constitution helps you know when your body needs support.

How Often Do You Need Self-Care?

Our bodies require regular care in order to thrive and heal, and one of the best ways to make sure we are on top of our self-care is to put it on our schedule instead of trying to fit it in around everything else. As a manual medicine and self-care practice, HaLe’ has experience with what kinds of schedules work best. Here are our recommendations, based on the state of your body:

Acute Pain: 3 classes/wk, bodywork every week

Acute pain is an active, painful flare up or injury. The body needs frequent treatment in order to release secondary tension, stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, support the lymph system, and generally assist the healing process.

Sub-acute: 1-2 classes/wk, bodywork every 2 weeks

Sub-acute pain falls between acute pain (sudden and awful) and chronic pain (long term, constant/consistent pain). It means that something hurts, but it hasn’t been hurting for a very long time and it isn’t terrible. The body is not in crisis but still in need of support and healing, so regular treatment until it resolves is recommended.

Chronic: Start with 2-3 classes/wk and bodywork every 1-2 weeks, then taper down

Chronic pain is long term pain that is not healing or getting better, and can be anywhere on the spectrum from unbearable to really annoying. Addressing chronic pain involves a combination of treatments to reduce overall pain levels and to treat the root cause of the chronic condition. This usually means coming often at the beginning, and as treatment makes progress at interrupting the pain cycle, tapering off gradually until treatments reach a maintenance level.

Maintenance: 1-2 classes/wk, bodywork every 4 weeks

To maintain a level of general good health and low pain, we recommend a basic self-care schedule. This helps resolve issues before they begin to hurt, reduces baseline stress levels, hydrates the connective tissue (fascia), and promotes a general sense of well-being. People who are very active or athletic may need more frequent self-care maintenance.

The Therapeutic Benefits of Balls and Rollers

Therapy balls and rollers offer many of the benefits of bodywork, but with the accessibility of a self-care practice and classes. Bodywork and massage therapy has a long list of benefits for overall health, pain management, athletic performance, and immune function. Sessions are one on one and highly individualized to each client’s body and what will best support their health.

Not everyone is able to receive bodywork or massage as often as their body needs it, though. A reasonable health maintenance schedule for bodywork is once every 2 or 4 weeks, and busy schedules and finances can make that difficult for everyone to access. That’s where the balls and rollers come in! With a grippy texture and firm (but not hard) to the touch, they can support health in many of the same ways bodywork does.

The ball or roller is able to mimic what the therapist does with their hands and feet, using slow, firm pressure to create length and hydration. They can address pressure points, lengthen fascia, relax muscle tension, and rehydrate tissues. Classes can get anyone started with these tools, as a trained teacher leads students through proper techniques and teaches them what to notice. Each student needs to learn the difference between sensations that create health, and pain that does damage.

Once a student has learned the basics in class, they can begin to integrate balls and rollers into their own self-care practice at home. Self treatments like releasing the IT band after each long run, or addressing pressure points on the hands to relax head and neck tension after a day on the computer, can go a long way to maintaining a daily sense of ease and vitality. This also allows bodywork and massage sessions to become more effective as they can spend more time addressing root causes of discomfort.

At HaLe’, discovering the therapeutic use of balls and rollers was an Aha! moment for us. We had tried for years to figure out a way for clients to continue their treatments off the massage table. Yoga is a great complement to bodywork, but it does not work with the body in the same way. Now we can encourage clients to come to class, learn the techniques, and then use them as often as they need to in order to support and maintain the specialized bodywork they receive on the table.

The Health Benefits of Relaxation

Relaxation is one of the easiest ways to increase health and vitality. Without regular relaxation, stress levels can creep to dangerously high levels that negatively affect health. Relaxation practices ideally set aside time each day, as well as longer breaks on a weekly, monthly, and yearly rotation.  Here are 9 ways relaxation can create health:

1. Protects Your Heart: The research is unanimously in favor of relaxation for heart health. Stress is as bad for your heart as other risk factors like high blood pressure and lack of exercise, and sudden shocks can cause a burst of adrenaline that can keep the heart from functioning correctly.

2. Reduce Inflammation/Boost Immune System: Chronic stress can double your risk of catching a cold, likely because it interferes with your body’s ability to “turn off” its inflammation response.

3. Improve Memory: Stress can impair the functioning of the prefrontal cortex, and even small stressors can reduce the brain’s ability to learn and remember.

4. Lower Risk of Stroke: People who cope best with stressful situations reduce their risk of stroke by 24%.

5. Fight Depression: The stress hormone cortisol can reduce levels of dopamine and seratonin, which is linked to depression.

6. Regulate Appetite: A lack of rest and regular sleep increases our appetite, especially for less healthy foods. Reducing stress and getting enough sleep is very helpful for bringing the body’s hunger cues back into healthy balance.

7. Better Problem Solving: Stress can kill brain cells in the hippocampus, which is linked to complex thinking and problem solving, whereas a good nap increases problem solving abilities by allowing the brain to work on making new connections between bits of information.

8. More Inspiration: When you turn down the volume of the outside world and relax into yourself, your intuitive and inspired self can be heard more easily.

9. Get to Know your Whole Self: A practice of restful self care opens you up to understanding who you are as a whole person, instead of focusing only on what you DO.

Boosting the Immune System

Manual Medicine supports deep health in the body, including boosting the immune system. Self care practices like yoga, as well as bodywork, massage, and mindfulness, are all proven to increase immune function.

Bodywork, massage, and self-care practices based on movement specifically promote increased lymph circulation. This supports the removal of pathogens and other waste from the body and helps spread white blood cells throughout the system, where they can respond quickly to immune challenges. This increases a person’s ability to fight infections.

Additionally, all of the manual medicine offerings at HaLe’ are effective for reducing cortisol, which is the hormone produced by high levels of pressure and stress. High levels of cortisol can boost blood pressure and reduce levels of natural killer cells in the immune system. Bringing those levels back down allows the immune system to function without that interference, restoring its effectiveness.

This is the time of year when immune systems can feel especially challenged by the perfect storm of lingering winter viruses and budding pollen allergies. Manual Medicine (literally, medicine you do by hand) provides powerful therapies to help boost and regulate the immune system, keeping it effective against the right kind of challenges.

What Really Works for Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to the doctor, and there are new guidelines on how to treat it. Researchers analyzed more than 150 studies to understand what really works and what doesn’t. The conclusion: instead of medication, try yoga, massage, or mindfulness.

These guidelines, published by the American College of Physicians on Feb 13, 2017, say to use techniques that speed up the healing process to relax muscles, joints and tendons. This can be done through massage, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation, as well as mind-body therapies like yoga, tai chi, and mindfulness-based stress reduction.

This new recommendation is in alignment with the new CDC & FDA guidelines for the usage of opiods, which are now known to be inappropriate for chronic pain management. It instead recommends trying massage, yoga, and mindfulness first, then NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen to reduce inflammation. Acetaminophen is not recommended, since it does not reduce pain or inflammation.

Low back pain is common, and the way it is currently treated in medical settings is a good example of low value health care: expensive tests and therapies that don’t fix the problem. Moving to more effective treatments for both acute and chronic conditions by recommending yoga, massage, and mindfulness will help reduce suffering in patients and frustration in those who treat them.

At HaLe’, our manual medicine therapists and our self-care class instructors are experienced in treating low back pain. For regular aches and injuries, we recommend you come to class or make an appointment. For more severe conditions, please talk with us so we can guide you to the right treatment plan for your body.

 

What is Integrative Medicine?

HaLe’ offers integrative health care based on a personal relationship. We want to talk with you, hear more about what is going on with your whole person, and address whatever you think needs help or optimization. We build on your strengths to help increase function, reduce stress, manage pain, and improve athletic performance.

Integrative medicine is a form of health care that focuses on the whole person. It uses evidence-based practices, which means your treatments have been proven to help. Taking a “yes, and” approach, all appropriate therapies and disciplines are utilized in order to achieve optimal health and healing.

At HaLe’, our template treatment plan is to begin a self-care practice with our classes, and to support that practice through individualized care to address deeper or acute issues. Our instructors are experts in customizing and modifying classes in order to meet the needs of both new beginner students and experienced students looking to deepen their practice. Our therapists offer manual medicine in the form of  bodywork, massage, mindfulness, and coaching sessions to really address the specific needs of each client.

52% of manual medicine is utilized for medical treatment

19% of manual medicine is for pain relief & pain management

72% of self-care classes are utilized for stress relief

86% of students in self-care classes report high mental clarity

Integrative Medicine is non-invasive with few side effects and little evidence of harm. It is supported by the majority of PCPs and most clients notice their health conditions change for the better, along with improvements in overall health, better habits, improved mood, and body awareness.

Cranium to Sacrum Connections

The connection of our head to our tail dramatically affects our sense of ourselves in our own bodies. When healthy, it supports the function of our nervous system and our ability to move easily through space with coordination and balance.

The head and the tail are the cranium and the sacrum. The sacrum, located at the end of the spine in the pelvis, is important to the proper function of our spine and our ability to know where our body is in space, called proprioception. If our pelvic proprioceptors are not sending information up the spine to the brain, our cranial proprioceptors will compensate, especially in the jaw. Grinding teeth becomes the body’s strategy for regaining some lost balance and coordination, and for moving fluid through the central nervous system.

Going the other way, jaw issues get reflected in the pelvis and jaw tension can cause pelvic tension. Dental surgery, head and jaw injuries, and orthodontia can all have echoing effects on pelvic health, as dysfunction or instability on the one end will cause similar issues on the other end.

There are several techniques to help the head and the tail stay coordinated and healthy. Tension and dysfunction often cause twisting and shortening. This can be released through work that stretches, lengthens, and supports the tissues to help restore them to their healthy functions.

A good place to begin balancing your head with your tail is to come to yoga or other self-care classes. They will help with the stretching and elongating that can be so effective.  Complement your classes with massage and bodywork sessions that will be tailored to exactly where your body is holding tension and directly address your specific dysfunctions. Bringing your cranium and your sacrum into harmony can have a profound effect on your overall health and sense of wellbeing.

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