What is Fascia?

Fascia is connective tissue made primarily of collagen that connects every part of the body, and often serves as a storage medium for fat and water, and as a passageway for lymph, nerve, and blood vessels. It also surrounds organs, glands, and individual muscles, and suspends the organs within their cavities. It is a complex system that literally connects every part of the body with every other part and can have a profound effect on health.

The full roll of fascia in the body and its relation to health is just now being explored because imaging technology has only recently been able to show us how the living fascia looks and acts. Problems with the fascia happen when it loses its stiffness, becomes too stiff, or isn’t otherwise able to move the way it needs to move. When it is too loose it can lead to organ prolapse, and when it is too tight, it can cause organ dysfunction and muscle pain. Fascia is also probably a crucial part of our ability to sense where our bodies are in space, to sense pain, and to feel internal sensations.

Lengthening and hydrating are the key ways to support the health of our fascia systems. Fascia does not stretch, and so lengthening happens through certain kinds of slow, steady applied pressure. Hydrating is not a matter of drinking liquids, but instead of activating and moving the water and other fluids already stored in the fascia.

At HaLe’, we offer both therapies and classes to support the health of the fascia. Our classes are great generalized treatments, especially our MELT Method and Girls with Balls classes, and so make a wonderful foundation for a strong self-care practice. For more acute or chronic conditions, we offer bodywork and massage to address the fascia in ways only a trained therapist can provide. Our myofascial release and Rolf Therapy offerings work specifically with the fascia to reduce pain and muscular dysfunction, and our Ashiatsu massage therapists use slow, applied foot pressure to very precisely and effectively lengthen and hydrate fascia.