A lot of runners don’t know the two types of stretching that help running: Pre and Post. Pre-run stretches need to be focused on warming up the area, especially legs and hips, and creating blood flow and some flexibility. Stretches should not be held for very long, only two or three breaths, because you can overtax a muscle by stretching it and if you do that before you start, it will make you feel weaker during your run. Pre-run stretching should be about 5 min and focused on getting heat and blood flow into the areas you’ll be using.

Post-run stretches are different from pre-run stretches. They should be held for longer, about 6 or 7 breaths, and will help work out any tightness. It is important to really focus on the breath, taking nice deep breaths with full exhales to help clear the body of lactic acid. There also is no concern about over stressing or tiring the muscles through stretching because this is when you want them to relax.

A regular yoga practice is also of great benefit to runners. If you think you’re just running with your legs, you’re not going to run very long. Beyond the usual focus on the legs and hips, the calf muscles, hamstrings, and the flexibility of the hips allow the whole pelvic area to work efficiently. Ultimately what you are trying to achieve is the strength and flexibility to allow your body systems to work together and avoid injury.

Yoga is about balance and teaching our bodies how everything is connected and how it all works together. All movement comes from the core, and so strengthening the core and teaching the body how to move fluidly without overstressing one particular part of the body will allow you to run faster, longer, and to avoid injury, so that running can become a lifelong adventure.

 


Liz Trinkler has been running for 40 years without injury and has completed 5 marathons. She teaches Ha.Lé Yoga on Mondays and Wednesdays 12:00-12:50.

by Katherine Casey, LAc

Just as there is a blood circulatory system, there is also a circulatory system for energy, or qi (pronounced chi). Qi flows continuously in a channel system, just like blood flows continuously in the circulatory system. The distribution of blood and qi throughout the body brings nourishment to all of its organs and systems, right down to the cellular level, and supports all of its functions.

Along these channels are acupuncture points, each with a unique property and purpose. A combination of points is selected by the practitioner according to the needs of the client receiving the acupuncture treatment. Placing needles in these acupuncture points serves to deliver a message to the qi flowing in the channels–perhaps to nourish a part of the body that has been injured, or to nourish an organ that is in a state of deficiency. For example, if the client has a cold, this would indicate a deficiency in the lungs. The points selected for treatment would address this deficiency, sending a message for the qi to support the lungs and bring them back to a healthier state.

The body’s natural state is one of health, but we sometimes find ourselves out of that natural state due to the stresses of daily life. Sleep patterns, diet, exercise, stress caused by working environments and life events, all have an effect on the state of our health. The objective of acupuncture is to bring the body back to that natural state of health, by supporting its own self healing capabilities. The acupuncture practitioner and the client are equal partners in this healing process.

Pelvic health has a huge effect on quality of life. Daily activities influence pelvic health in ways we may not be aware, like sitting postures, bathroom habits, etc. Learning what your pelvis holds and how it is interrelated to your anatomy can be very empowering. Gaining this knowledge helps increase awareness and appreciation for the pelvis and its important functions as the floor to the spine, connector of hips and pelvis, holder of organs and babies, etc.  Understanding what “normal” pelvic floor function is can be a starting point of awareness.

Dysfunction in pelvic health happens across the population, from pediatric to elderly, and can be affected by more things than having babies and aging. Improving pelvic function often helps with pain that is not responding to other therapies, especially low back pain, as well as bowel and bladder dysfunction, painful intercourse, and lumbar and spine dysfunction. The pelvic floor depends on the spine, abdomen, breath, and lower and upper extremity strength and function. Conditions such as low blood pressure and bowel and bladder issues may be directly related to pelvic dysfunction.

There are simple daily habits you can be aware of to bring better health to your pelvic area, including certain postures, bowel and bladder habits, and exercises. Histories of trauma, like sexual or physical trauma, pregnancy, birth, or surgery can all have an effect on pelvic health.

The most important starting place, though, is to learn to breathe into the pelvis. When you inhale, bring your breath all the way down to your vagina and/or perineum, and then fill the diaphragm, and then the chest. The pelvis is a body part you can’t see, and once you can be still enough to connect with it, there is an awareness that will open up. So be still, be with the breath, and breathe into the pelvis for pelvic health.