The keys to taking care of your body while traveling are hydration, combating insomnia, and body comfort. We’ve asked some of our expert team how to best support the body through travel. Here is what they said:

Acupuncture AppleAcupuncture: These three acupressure points will help support your body through jet lag and travel weariness:

Stomach 36: Stretch legs out in front of you and place a pillow under your knees. Place the fingers of your right hand directly under the left kneecap. Just under the little finger, about a thumb’s distance from the shin bone you will find a little hollow place. That is S 36. Apply gentle even pressure for about a couple minutes and repeat on the other side.

Xin Bao 6: Find the wrist crease on the palm side of the left hand. Measure 2 thumb widths from the crease. The point is located between the tendons. Apply gentle pressure with the tip of the thumb for a minute or so. Repeat on the other side.

Ren 6: Lie comfortably on your back. Place the first 3 fingers of your left hand directly below your navel. With your right hand, place your index finger directly below your navel right next to your 3rd finger. Massage this point for a couple of minutes.

 

Woman On Yoga BolsterYoga and Therapeutic Movement:  When you come back from a trip, remember that there are 2 parts to a really good yoga practice: the physical, and what I call telling the truth. Physically, prioritize getting sleep, listen to your body, and allow a couple of days on either side of the trip to settle back in and recalibrate before you go back to your usual schedule.

A yoga posture that is especially helpful is a gentle forward fold, where you stand with your sitting bones on the wall, walk your feet forward 12-18 inches from the wall, and then bend forward. This has elements of child’s pose as you lay along your thighs, allowing you to breathe into your back a bit. Also helpful are gentle twists, inversions, downward dog, and cat-cow for spinal releasing.

For the second part, Telling the Truth, find a person that can hear you and is present for you where you are. Have a conversation about your trip and anything that shifted, or realizations, or experiences. Trips can often rearrange us a little and it is very grounding to connect with your people when you come back.

 

Various spices and herbsAyurveda & Nutrition:

Take Ashwaganda, which is a rejuvenate and helps with the way travel throws off the body’s biochemistry. Take it the night before and then while traveling, especially to help sleep. (available at HaLe’)

Take Triphala, which helps fix constipation, assists with detoxification, and regulates the bowels. (available at HaLe’)

Drink lots of water, and in summer, put things in the water like cucumber or mint to help cool your body.

Do dry massage: take a dry washcloth before you get in the bath and start at your ankles, brushing up toward the heart to get circulation going. This is especially good for when you’ve been sitting a long time.

 

zen stones jy wooden banch on the beach near sea. OutdoorBodywork: Biochemical processes don’t move as fast as we can travel, so the body needs support in catching up.

Help reset your sleep cycle with exposure to natural sun for at least 20 min. Using a natural sleep aid such as melatonin can also help.

Balance the hips and release the neck and shoulders because those can get compacted during travel.

We need to stay more hydrated than usual. Coconut water and bottled spring water are especially good. 

Diet-wise, eat bananas and maybe some nuts. Avoid fatty foods, spicy foods, dairy, and caffeine.

Take an epsom salt bath with a little lavender or something in it that rejuvenates to help with travel weariness. 

by Katherine Casey, LAc

If you have never had any experience with acupuncture before, you are probably concerned about the needles. This is understandable, because the only needles we are familiar with are hypodermic needles, which are hollow-bodied, and designed to either take something out of us (blood), or put something in us (medication). Neither experience is ever very pleasant!

Acupuncture needles are completely different from hypodermic needles. They are very thin, solid body (meaning, they aren’t hollow like hypodermic needles are), and they serve the purpose of delivering a message. They direct qi (that animating force that keeps us alive, pronounced “chi”) to do something, like “go over here and nourish the lungs because this body has a bad cold.”

Another concern people often have about acupuncture needles is whether or not they are reused. And the answer to this is an unequivocal and emphatic NO. Acupuncture needles arrive from the supplier in sterile packaging, and they are single use only, just like hypodermic needles. They are disposed of in a sharps container just like the ones found in doctors’ offices and hospitals. Acupuncture needles are never, ever reused.

by Katherine Casey, LAc

The history of cupping is documented in the medical histories of many parts of the world, including countries of Africa, Europe, the Middle East, as well as Asian countries. Cupping is the practice of applying specially designed cups to the skin using suction for the purpose of relieving muscle pain, reducing swelling, and increasing the circulation of blood and qi to an injured area. It can be used to assist in lymphatic drainage and in reducing cellulite. Cupping can also aid in alleviating digestive issues, such as constipation. Facial cupping can aid in the reduction of fine lines and facial puffiness.

Historically all kinds of items were used for cupping– animal horns, bamboo, stone, and sea shells are some of the materials used for cupping. Nowadays, in the modern clinic setting specially designed glass cups are used, as well as cups made of polycarbonate plastic or silicone, all of which can be easily cleaned after use.

How does it work? In order to answer this question let’s compare massage therapy and cupping. Massage therapy creates “positive pressure” by compressing tissue to relieve muscle tension. In constrast, cupping uses suction to create “negative pressure.” The suction action of cupping expands and opens up the layers of body tissue, allowing better circulation of blood and qi.

Cupping will often leave round marks, commonly referred to as bruises, though the marks are not true bruises, like those that occur from a compression injury. The marks gradually disappear a few days after treatment.

from Janice Glasscock, LCSW

Behavioral health care and mental health care focus on thought processes and emotions, on personal narrative, and helping the mind communicate with the brain. This allows us to better understand our own stories and feelings so that we can make better decisions and act towards healing.

Behavioral and mental health care is especially useful for people in situations that feel stuck, full of loss or fear, and/or during large transitions. These situations can include an unhealthy pattern in a relationship, moving into new parenthood, and launching children from home. They can also be about dealing with a life threatening health condition or diagnosis, stage of life transitions like aging or health concerns, work place or work relationship concerns, or the loss of a significant relationship.

Approximately 67% of people with behavioral or mental health concerns do not receive treatment, and these concerns account for about half of disability days from work. Depression is the #1 condition currently affecting health care costs right now, and it has a global and pervasive impact on health issues and conditions.

We can improve our overall sense of well-being, health, and quality of life by paying attention to our behavioral and mental health as a part of our mind, body, and spirit interplay. This means paying attention to our thinking and cognitive processes, and to our decisions and actions. Strong behavioral and mental health helps with:

  • positive, effective work and personal relationships
  • good life choices and lifestyle development
  • physical health/well-being
  • handling natural ups and downs of life, and coping during life crises
  • self-discovery and personal growth

Psychotherapy as treatment for behavioral and mental health concerns is an evidence-based way to reduce depression and anxiety and more effectively cope and problem solve. It has long-lasting benefits, and helps to address chronic low and high levels of stress that are on-going contributors to compromised health and well-being.

Within a positive, safe, and constructive relationship with a professional, psychotherapy helps identify and better understand cognitive sources of unease, and to change/broaden thinking about both the problems of daily living and the catastrophic, all-consuming psychological and emotional crises from which we need recovery. It is a great modality to help us take action on the paths of healing.

from Elmo Shade

The most common reasons people come to a Mindfulness Practice are

  1. Physical pain or chronic pain
  2. Emotional pain due to loss, death, or serious or potentially fatal diagnosis
  3. Inability to manage the day to day stressors of life

The benefits of mindfulness are known and well-documented. It reduces levels of stress, meaning the autonomic nervous system is not in fight, flight, or freeze mode. This then reduces both anxiety and depression, reduces fatigue and burnout, and reduces periods of restlessness. This leads to an increased ability to pay attention and concentrate and higher cognitive performance, particularly while learning. It enhances hormonal balance for women, and enhances the immune system of men and women.

Chronic pain, many of our physical ailments, and even diseases that we are experiencing are not actually illnesses or diseases. They are a result of the body system storing stress and pain that has never actually been released in a healthy manner. Mindfulness helps to reduce the discomfort of pain, both emotional and physical, and increases our capacity for compassion for ourselves and others.

Because Mindfulness Practice is about paying attention to physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual energies, it often leads to increased levels of energy. It can decrease fatigue and increase stamina. This higher energy level then brings increased movement. The American Psychiatric Association shows we spend 6-12 hours a day not moving, and this does not count the time we spend sleeping. Having the energy to move is a tremendous benefit.

Mindfulness Practice is evidence-based and proven to benefit quality of life through the reduction of physical pain, emotional pain, and chronic stress. Our collective stress levels are higher than they have ever been, especially for women, and that takes a toll on our health. We can bring ourselves back into balance through mindfulness.