The change of seasons can shake things up in a body and affect the balance of health. The roots of our systems, rhythms, and routines loosen. New order is about to be established, but hopefully not before a good cleansing. Here are several simple ways to support your body through the seasonal shift:

Massage & Bodywork: The changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature affect the lymphatic system and its ability to clear out the body. This especially true for people with damaged lymphatic systems, but a lot of people will begin to feel bloated and icky, and generally not great. The lymphatic support of massage helps the body complete its cleansing process and move body fluids. Any kind of massage will help with this, though if deep, vigorous massage doesn’t sound good to you, consider trying a gentler technique like lymphatic massage or relaxation massage.

Cupping Therapy: These cups use negative pressure (suction) to literally create space in the body. This allows the old stagnated blood to be broken up and moved out. The body’s response is to heal and restore the area that received the cupping, which brings a sense of lighter, cleaner space in the body, a free flow of energy, and room for new possibilities.

Yoga: The onset of Fall is a powerful time to use our yoga practice as a means to re-balance the body. Big exhales, deep twists, and gentle forward folds help to prepare us for the onset of brisk weather. Winter is soon approaching. We want to shake out our bodies and flush away the unnecessary holding so that we can comfortably turn inward and nestle into ourselves during the darker months of Winter.

Ayurveda: Support other cleansing practices with tongue scraping. Do it every morning, back to front. Cleanses build up ama, or toxins, which are described as a sticky waste. Scraping these from the tongue keeps the toxins from being redirected back into the body, and reduces bad breath. Also make sure to take extra time to rest, and try to plan your cleanse during a time when you can take it easy.

Mental Cleansing Meditation: Visualize the mind space as rooms in your house. With eyes closed and body upright, awake, and alert, travel from room to room repeating these cleansing phrases:

  • Entry hall / front door: “Breathing in, I know I am breathing in. Breathing out, I know I am breathing out.”
  • Great room / main living area: “Being here, Being now.”
  • Kitchen: “Letting go of worry, Letting be this moment.”
  • Bedroom: “Calming the mind, Releasing the tension.”
  • Bathroom: “I can have peace any moment,I have peace in this moment.”
  • Attic / crawl space / basement: “Nowhere to go, No one to be, Just being.”

by Elmo Shade

There are simple ways to begin a mindfulness practice.  It’s not mystical or magical; anyone can do this.

1. The Easy Way: The 3-Breath Technique (sit or stand)

Picture an hourglass wide at the top & bottom with a narrow center.

Breathe IN (count of 5) through nostrils deep into belly (expands) then breathe OUT through nose and/or mouth (count of 7).

Connect with the wide, open space of the present moment.

Breathe IN and connect with a particular part of your body, e.g. palms, feet, heart as though you were aerating it with the breath, then breathe OUT. Same count of 5 and 7.

Breathe IN and connect with the ENTIRE body, widening your awareness and spaciousness, then breathe OUT, same count as before.

 

2. The Easier Way: Sit or stand without any agenda for 2-5 minutes

Shift from “doing” to just “being” whatever that means for you

Watch where the mind goes without judging it or trying to change anything you are experiencing. Just allow.

Feel free to switch between the “Easy Way” and the “Easier Way”.

Begin with 2-5 minutes daily, expand to 2-5 minutes during the day whenever you have an opportunity and/or are feeling stressed.

The more you “practice” the stronger your “mindfulness muscle” becomes.

 

3. Mindfulness in Motion:

Sit with back supporting itself by moving to middle or front of chair

Feet are flat on the floor. Sense the 4 corners of the feet with your awareness (sides of big and little toes and both sides of heel)

Hands rest on knees, palms down

On IN breath, retract hands back moving along upper thighs until heel of hand touches hip bone (waist)

On OUT breath move hands back down slowly to starting position at knees

Do 5X

Then, on IN breath, retract hands back as before

On OUT breath, move hands past knees all the way down to ankles

On next IN breath, retract hands all the way back up hip bone (waist)

Do 5X

With both iterations, sync the breath so top of the IN breath is at the TOP of the movement and bottom of the OUT breath is at the BOTTOM of the movement

 

by Chelsea Henry

Therapeutic Yoga uses yoga as a specific, individualized treatment that draws on a deep expertise and understanding of the body. All yoga can have therapeutic benefits, bringing healing and balance to the body, mind, and spirit. Therapeutic Yoga, however, is designed specifically around encouraging these therapeutic benefits and comes from a place of expert anatomical and physiological training.

One great benefit of Therapeutic Yoga is that it opens up yoga practice to a much larger population than would otherwise try yoga. An important goal of classes is that students leave feeling better than when they came in, and that they feel successful at having done yoga, regardless of the injury, disease, or illness they might be working with.

A Therapeutic Yoga class meets the students where they are, so that they are not struggling and can really find inner rest. It is not just a gentle approach, but also very precisely meets their body with support at the exact right angle for their needs, using blankets and other props as well as hands-on adjustments.

As an example, in our Neck and Back Care Yoga class, blanket support and other adjustments are used to really specialize and create the right angle to access the spine specifically. Every pose begins with pranayama breathing practice, and then the sequences begin by opening up the tailbone, and then the sacrum area, lumbar spine, and ribcage. People often come in with neck and shoulder issues and find that just the breathing itself begins to open up their range of motion, changing the neck by opening the spine, and then they feel an improvement in their neck and shoulders.

Therapeutic Yoga is a powerful healing method, accessible to every body. Students don’t have to be advanced practitioners, or even flexible. This is a reasonable self-care tool that meets students exactly where they are, at the intersection of their mind and their body. It is like finding a sliding door, rather than pushing or pulling the door to get in, and it accesses the amazing healing power of our bodies.

Ryoko Suzuki contributed to this article.

Sitting at a desk is hard on the body. Here are several ways to easily reduce the knots and tension:

1. Start with Right Angles. Adjust your workspace so that your feet, hips, and arms are at right angles to the floor. Your screen should be directly in front of your eyes so that your neck remains neutral, neither craned up or hunched down. Your keyboard should be in easy reach with your arms parallel to the floor. No need to strain to keep a straight back; use a pillow to bring the chair back closer to you. You can also use a small stool to bring the floor up to your feet and stacks of books to adjust the height of the computer and keyboard.

2. Engage the Core. A lot of pain that comes from sitting is caused by a weak core, since sitting allows the belly to soften. Try a sneaky seated crunch: Put both hands on your thighs, then try to curl your chest down toward your legs while resisting the movement with the arms. Hold this for 10 seconds and then release. This can especially help with low back pain and sometimes neck pain as well.

3. Rest the Eyes. Cup your palms over your eyes, with the heels of your hands resting on the cheekbones. It is hard on our eyes to stay at one focal distance for an extended period of time, like staring at a computer screen, and palming the eyes every so often helps to change that distance. The eyes affect our entire nervous system, and so releasing eye strain helps our entire body relax.

4. Stretch the Pecs. Use a door frame or clasp your hands behind your back to stretch your pecs every time you get up. The pecs are the root of a lot of upper back and shoulder tension, and even some neck tension. The shoulders roll forward and inward when sitting at a computer, which tightens the pecs and stretches the upper back beyond what it can support for prolonged periods of time. Stretching the pecs regularly during your workday helps offset this process.

5. Stand Up Every 30 min. Stand up and maybe walk around a little every 30 minutes, and it will do wonders for how you feel at the end of your workday. Our bodies are designed to be hunter gatherers and stay active throughout the day, so getting out of that sitting and concentrating position really makes a difference. Just standing up for a moment helps, but try to walk a little, take three deep belly breaths where you blow all the air out each time, twist your trunk back forth, and do some stretches like 8 Ways to Do Yoga at Your Desk.