from Janice Cathey & Jane House

Are we evolving, moving toward our higher selves? Our practice is important. It is revolutionary. When we are in living practice, we are asked to turn inward and meet ourselves. We turn inward and we breathe. We ask, what more can we do, what more can I do?

It starts with a singular, Am I taking care of myself? When we take care of our own well being, it sets the stage and grounds us to be able to contend with life. Life can be intense. That intensity has a way of seeping into our daily lives. It constricts the way that we behave in the world and though we may not realize it at first, over time that feeling of constriction results in something bigger than we knew; bigger than we were paying attention to.

A living practice helps us pay attention and to look within. Imagine a diver, diving inward to do the research, asking how do I feel right now, and how is my body? The body is not object; we are living organisms all co-creating our life together.

When we start having those conversations with ourselves, we can then start having those conversations with each other. When we have those conversations with each other, we create community. If we can come together and listen, come together with understanding, then perhaps we will grow our compassion. Compassion not only for others, but for ourselves, and for ourselves when we feel discomfort.

We are not a one size fits all culture. As we each develop our living practice of being fully engaged, participating, collaborating, and striving to live fully, we ask: What does it feel like to live in your life’s purpose? What does it feel like to live in vitality? We hope that HaLe’ can be a safe place for that practice of engagement, as we provide tools to both nourish and play.

Profound emotional release and calm can come through massage, bodywork, yoga, and gentle movement. Here is what some of our team members have to say about this process from their own experience and practices:

I’ve heard it said that the body never lies, and also that the body is faster than the mind. If this is true, we must honor our bodies and allow them to speak truth to us because they will know in their cells faster than we do in our minds. Yoga and body work provide safe environments in which we can be fully vulnerable, face our fears, and come to know our true selves. And our true selves can never be annihilated, they are infinite and eternal and we can rest easily when we remember and feel this. -Erin Law, Massage and Cupping Therapist

Stress, fear, anger, and other negative emotions stimulate our sympathetic nervous system, which is our fight or flight response. This causes our muscles to tense, and we have a higher respiration rate and higher heart rate than normal. Massage, bodywork, deep breathing, and gentle motion stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, which is our repose system. This counteracts the effects that come from thoughts of the future being different from what we anticipated. Also, positive touch and things that feel good stimulate the brain chemistry to bring deeper sleep, clearer thoughts, and movement toward a better emotional space. -Adie Grey MacKenzie, Massage Therapist

Yoga is considered by researchers to be the best evidence-based movement for stress reduction.  As we thoughtfully, intentionally, powerfully and beautifully move through the poses and the moving meditation that yoga provides, we move energy within and around us.  As we send breath, self-compassion, and strength during yoga to those places in us that are feeling unease or suffering, we create calm and quiet.  Our physical systems slow down and experience increased calm, our minds quiet, and we are better able to discern with wisdom and clarity what we need to do for ourselves and for others. Practicing yoga in community often creates comfort and a sense of belonging with others who are like-minded and like-spirited.  -Janice Glasscock, LCSW Psychotherapist

The practice of yoga is about finding equanimity and balance regardless of what is occurring around you.  Through an asana practice, one develops a stillness in one’s state of mind throughout the activity.  Just by doing the practice – the benefits of this ease and stillness awaits you. -Nancy Kirkland, Yoga Instructor

During this time of societal change, which may create turbulent and tumultuous feelings of uncertainty, yoga can be grounding and centering, and massage can support our emotional equilibrium.

from Will Ravenel

Lower back pain is the second most common complaint people bring to their doctors. Often chronic pain is structural in origin, and if it is structural, it is best treated through myofascial release. The structure of the body is determined by the fascia, which is connective tissue that surrounds and connects all muscles and systems of the body.

If the fascia is healthy, then the body is organized. If the structure is unhealthy, then the body is constantly fighting to achieve structural integrity. By working with the fascia, we can organize the body and restore its natural structural balance.

A body that has gone out of structural alignment won’t be fixed by chiropractic, because chiropractic focuses on realigning the skeleton and the skeleton is not what determines structure. The fascia determines structure. If fascial thickening is the cause of pain, only moving fascia will change the quality of the fascia. Stretching, Pilates, and yoga do not move fascia. Neither does Swedish massage nor using a foam roller.

Will Ravenel is the Myofascial Release and Structural Integration therapist at Ha.Le’, offering both single sessions and the full 10 Series of Rolf Therapy. In his extensive experience, low back pain is almost always caused by fascia issues.

Structural Integration as a treatment for chronic pain is not just about the bodywork sessions themselves. It is a collaboration between the therapist and the client. Will can teach an individual a more appropriate way of walking, sitting, and standing more efficiently within gravity, and more efficient movement means less energy expended and more balanced alignment. The client has to be open to learning a new way of living within gravity to do that. Once the sessions are over, the client can continue to achieve structural balance on their own.

Pain relief in general for structural issues like low back pain is best treated with myofascial release generally and with Structural Integration specifically.