Back pain is one of the most common reasons people go to the doctor, and there are new guidelines on how to treat it. Researchers analyzed more than 150 studies to understand what really works and what doesn’t. The conclusion: instead of medication, try yoga, massage, or mindfulness.

These guidelines, published by the American College of Physicians on Feb 13, 2017, say to use techniques that speed up the healing process to relax muscles, joints and tendons. This can be done through massage, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation, as well as mind-body therapies like yoga, tai chi, and mindfulness-based stress reduction.

This new recommendation is in alignment with the new CDC & FDA guidelines for the usage of opiods, which are now known to be inappropriate for chronic pain management. It instead recommends trying massage, yoga, and mindfulness first, then NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen to reduce inflammation. Acetaminophen is not recommended, since it does not reduce pain or inflammation.

Low back pain is common, and the way it is currently treated in medical settings is a good example of low value health care: expensive tests and therapies that don’t fix the problem. Moving to more effective treatments for both acute and chronic conditions by recommending yoga, massage, and mindfulness will help reduce suffering in patients and frustration in those who treat them.

At HaLe’, our manual medicine therapists and our self-care class instructors are experienced in treating low back pain. For regular aches and injuries, we recommend you come to class or make an appointment. For more severe conditions, please talk with us so we can guide you to the right treatment plan for your body.

 

HaLe’ offers integrative health care based on a personal relationship. We want to talk with you, hear more about what is going on with your whole person, and address whatever you think needs help or optimization. We build on your strengths to help increase function, reduce stress, manage pain, and improve athletic performance.

Integrative medicine is a form of health care that focuses on the whole person. It uses evidence-based practices, which means your treatments have been proven to help. Taking a “yes, and” approach, all appropriate therapies and disciplines are utilized in order to achieve optimal health and healing.

At HaLe’, our template treatment plan is to begin a self-care practice with our classes, and to support that practice through individualized care to address deeper or acute issues. Our instructors are experts in customizing and modifying classes in order to meet the needs of both new beginner students and experienced students looking to deepen their practice. Our therapists offer manual medicine in the form of  bodywork, massage, mindfulness, and coaching sessions to really address the specific needs of each client.

52% of manual medicine is utilized for medical treatment

19% of manual medicine is for pain relief & pain management

72% of self-care classes are utilized for stress relief

86% of students in self-care classes report high mental clarity

Integrative Medicine is non-invasive with few side effects and little evidence of harm. It is supported by the majority of PCPs and most clients notice their health conditions change for the better, along with improvements in overall health, better habits, improved mood, and body awareness.

The connection of our head to our tail dramatically affects our sense of ourselves in our own bodies. When healthy, it supports the function of our nervous system and our ability to move easily through space with coordination and balance.

The head and the tail are the cranium and the sacrum. The sacrum, located at the end of the spine in the pelvis, is important to the proper function of our spine and our ability to know where our body is in space, called proprioception. If our pelvic proprioceptors are not sending information up the spine to the brain, our cranial proprioceptors will compensate, especially in the jaw. Grinding teeth becomes the body’s strategy for regaining some lost balance and coordination, and for moving fluid through the central nervous system.

Going the other way, jaw issues get reflected in the pelvis and jaw tension can cause pelvic tension. Dental surgery, head and jaw injuries, and orthodontia can all have echoing effects on pelvic health, as dysfunction or instability on the one end will cause similar issues on the other end.

There are several techniques to help the head and the tail stay coordinated and healthy. Tension and dysfunction often cause twisting and shortening. This can be released through work that stretches, lengthens, and supports the tissues to help restore them to their healthy functions.

A good place to begin balancing your head with your tail is to come to yoga or other self-care classes. They will help with the stretching and elongating that can be so effective.  Complement your classes with massage and bodywork sessions that will be tailored to exactly where your body is holding tension and directly address your specific dysfunctions. Bringing your cranium and your sacrum into harmony can have a profound effect on your overall health and sense of wellbeing.

There is a difference between alertness and awareness.

Alertness is a state of being ready to react immediately to a stimulus. It activates the sympathetic nervous system, which prepares for a quick response. The body becomes ready to run or fight, but also to think quickly, make decisions, adjust plans, and catch falling objects.

Awareness, on the other hand, cultivates the parasympathetic nervous system, which calms, nurtures, and nourishes the body. It is a process of noticing and bringing attention to things without jumping into action. As a state of being instead of doing, it often brings a sense of expansiveness and ease to the body.

The stress of daily life often calls for alertness as we activate our sympathetic nervous systems and jump in to deal with crisis, solve problems, and move quickly from one thing to another. This is not a sustainable lifestyle, though. We need to also practice awareness to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system and to nourish and rebalance the body.

Practicing awareness brings resiliency and vitality to the body, so that there are deep reserves of energy to call upon when switching into action mode. The nervous system thrives when it has opportunities to replenish and restore, and our health is depleted when we are unable to switch off our alert action mode in order to rest.

Cultivating awareness in order to balance our times of alertness helps to raise our life energy and to better handle the stress of daily life. If you can only do one thing, try coming to class at HaLe’. Any and all of our classes will support your body in shifting into rest and repair mode. For deeper or more acute issues, explore the personalized care of our therapy offerings.