Being present allows the stress of what has happened (past) and what has not yet happened (future) to fall away from the mind. Instead we turn our attention to the present, which is where the body lives. Common, simple techniques focus on the breath or the rhythm of our heartbeat. By shifting our awareness to our physical sensations, we can begin to relax the alarm systems of stress and allow our bodies to turn on the internal systems of nourishment and healing.

There are many ways to cue the body and mind to come into the present, and one of our favorite techniques at HaLé is a gentle, supportive bodywork called Breema. Based on Nine Principles of Harmony, Breema teaches that we best support ourselves and one another by being present in the moment.

Breema combines different nurturing touches to support whole-bodied relaxation and health. This includes stretches to relieve tension along with compression and gentle touch. It also incorporates rhythmic movements and stillness as a way to keep your mind in your body and so in the present moment. Sessions are able to assist with physical flexibility, emotional balance, and mental clarity.

Breema and other forms of mindfulness practice that are based on awareness of the body help support an overall sense of vitality. Being in the present opens us to a sense of joy, connection, and gratitude. This in turn expands our understanding of self and helps us live a more meaningful life.

Compassion Fatigue can happen when our ability to empathize and stay open hearted takes on too much stress and trauma. Caring for and about others can deplete our mental, emotional, and physical resources, and compassion fatigue is what happens when those resources begin to bottom out. Self-care is an effective way to prevent compassion fatigue and to help come back into a place of open heartedness.

The first step to preventing compassion fatigue is an awareness of the signs and symptoms. These include deep exhaustion and reduced feelings of sympathy or empathy, as well as feeling guilty about not wanting to take care of others. Other signs are feeling irritable or anxious, headaches, trouble sleeping, and feeling less fulfilled or satisfied.

It can be useful to think about compassion fatigue on a scale of 0 – 10, especially during times when you are doing more caring work or offering yourself more generously. Checking in with yourself and how you are feeling helps you to recognize signs of emotional exhaustion before you are overly depleted.

You can prevent and treat compassion fatigue through self-care. Bodywork and massage, acupuncture, therapeutic movement classes like yoga, and psychotherapy all help you become less vulnerable to stress. By purposefully shifting your nervous system out of emergency mode and into rest and restore mode, you rebuild your capacity to care for others with generosity and compassion.

Compassion Fatigue can happen to anyone, and it can be easy to forget to care for yourself when you are focused on caring for others. Taking the time to bring awareness to how you are feeling and dedicating time to a practice of self-care can bring ease to the process of keeping an open heart.

At HaLé, we encourage everyone to come to class. Our classes are designed to work for a wide variety of bodies, ages, and experience levels. They are all therapeutic and mindfulness-based, which means they help create health, reduce stress, and improve your overall sense of wellbeing. They can also provide a powerful sense of community connection and support.

There is tremendous benefit in having a community with you as you practice. The human nervous system is wired for social interaction. When we watch another person do something, mirror neurons in our brains fire as if we are doing it ourselves. This not only helps us improve our own practice, but it boosts the effectiveness, as our minds amplify the benefits.

Learning and practicing self-care with others creates a positive interdependence. This builds trust, boosts motivation, and facilitates learning. It also reduces anxiety and stress levels because you are caring for yourself in a safe, welcoming group. Coming to class then becomes a way to support mental and emotional health and self-esteem.

Practicing in community is also a way to deepen and extend your self-care to get the most benefit. Because self-care happens at the intersection of expert tools and dedicated time, it is often marketed as a product you can buy and do at home. However, spending the time is more important than buying the tool. For best results, come to class and spend an hour taking care of yourself, with whichever set of tools and class description works for you.

When we practice in community, it uses the social wiring of our nervous system to deepen our benefits, dedicate more time, and care for ourselves more deeply. Come to class, any class, as often as possible. The community support boosts the benefit of the practice itself, creating a sense of deep health and wellbeing.

Bodywork and massage are great treatments for emotional health as well as pain and tension. Regular sessions have been shown to improve mood after as little as 15 min, and can help treat stress, anxiety, depression, and trauma.

The emotional benefits of massage and bodywork begin with relaxation, a sense of peace, and self-awareness. From the first moments you lay on the therapy table, your body begins to cue your nervous system that you are now warm and safe and can begin to relax. Your heartbeat slows, your breathing deepens, and your stress hormone levels begin to drop. Your treatment continues to deepen this relaxation response and bring your awareness inward to your body.

Receiving regular bodywork and massage allows the treatments to build on each other, so that sometimes just walking into the treatment room can begin the cascade of positive emotions and biological responses. Regular treatments are especially effective for depression and anxiety, as they release endorphins like serotonin and dopamine and reduce stress hormone levels, which helps to improve and regulate mood.

Bodywork can also help release emotional trauma that has been stored in the body as tension or dysfunction. It becomes a great complement to other therapies, supporting the work of psychotherapy, mindfulness, and other treatments that work to heal emotional trauma and support an overall sense of well-being.

Our bodies and minds are inherently connected to each other, which allows bodywork and massage to provide effective support for emotional health. The healing power of touch combines with the safety and warmth of a quality therapist to create space for emotional release, mood regulation, and an improved sense of wellness.  

November and December can be some of the most wonderful and most stressful months of the year. Family closeness, preparing for celebrations, and colder, darker days can all bring depression and anxiety as well as comfort and joy. HaLé has expanded our psychotherapy offerings in time to support you through this potentially difficult time of year.

Susan Dendtler, MA, believes that we are all born with a great capacity for love, creativity, joy, and kindness. She has taught Restorative Yoga classes at HaLé for the last year, and is now seeing psychotherapy clients as well. She specializes in restorative practice and integrating yoga with mental health, and is able to meet each person where they are.

Susie embraces those of different cultures, genders, ages, and sexual orientations, and she is committed to creating a welcoming environment for everyone. She sees individuals and couples to process emotions, heal, and overcome any internal or external barriers to reaching their full expression of self. She has extensive experience working with children, teens and parents who have experienced trauma, grief, and loss, and is certified in Trust Based Relational Interventions and Trauma Informed Care.

Whether you need a little extra support through seasonal anxiety or depression, or have deeper emotions ready for healing, Psychotherapy at HaLé can help provide the emotional nourishment you need for your own health and wellbeing.